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Last post 4 weeks ago by Stogie1020. 879 replies replies.
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What are you reading?
Gene363 Offline
#651 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Helmet for my Pillow: From Parris Island to the Pacific

By: Robert Leckie

Took a bit to get into this one, but after that it was a good read that gave an intimate view into individual lives of Marines fighting in the WWII Pacific theatre.

"The purely human experience of war in the Pacific, written in the graceful imagery of a human being who—somehow—survived.”—Tom Hanks

Quote:
Helmet for My Pillow is the personal narrative written by World War II United States Marine Corps veteran, author, and military historian Robert Leckie. First published in 1957, the story begins with Leckie's enlisting in the United States Marines shortly after the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.
deadeyedick Offline
#652 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 15,033
Full Dissidence - Notes from an uneven playing field

~ Howard Bryant senior writer for ESPN

Frank, you would enjoy this look at American white/black relations through the eyes of a native Bostonian
frankj1 Offline
#653 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 42,718
deadeyedick wrote:
Full Dissidence - Notes from an uneven playing field

~ Howard Bryant senior writer for ESPN

Frank, you would enjoy this look at American white/black relations through the eyes of a native Bostonian

iirc, Bryant had a brief career on air in Boston.

don't read much these days, have one started (Frederick Douglass per RobertHively) and just picked up talking to Strangers (per CelticBomber) but I'm thinking you know of what you speak...thanks
Gene363 Offline
#654 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
A Higher Call

By Adam Makos with Larry Alexander

This is a great story about a German fighter pilot that spares an almost destroyed B17 and the wounded crew. The back story of the two pilots is excellent and gives a glimpse into life in prewar and war time Germany.

Quote:
December, 1943: A badly damaged American bomber struggles to fly over wartime Germany. At the controls is twenty-one-year-old Second Lieutenant Charlie Brown. Half his crew lay wounded or dead on this, their first mission. Suddenly, a Messerschmitt fighter pulls up on the bomber’s tail. The pilot is German ace Franz Stigler—and he can destroy the young American crew with the squeeze of a trigger...

What happened next would defy imagination and later be called “the most incredible encounter between enemies in World War II.”

The U.S. 8th Air Force would later classify what happened between them as “top secret.” It was an act that Franz could never mention for fear of facing a firing squad. It was the encounter that would haunt both Charlie and Franz for forty years until, as old men, they would search the world for each other, a last mission that could change their lives forever.
8trackdisco Offline
#655 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,594
Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don't Know - Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell, host of the podcast Revisionist History and author of the number-one New York Times best seller Outliers, reinvents the audiobook in this immersive production of Talking to Strangers, a powerful examination of our interactions with people we don’t know.

Interesting theory, most of which I agree with.
frankj1 Offline
#656 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 42,718
next in line for me.
8trackdisco Offline
#657 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,594
frankj1 wrote:
next in line for me.


The guy does his homework, and documents everything with several individual stories. Some of it is stomach turning (Jerry Sandusky @ Pedd State) And others almost hard to fathom.

The two stories on young men and young woman with alcohol involved is a nightly disaster happening. That one looks to be truly hopeless. Unless people stop drinking in college.
frankj1 Offline
#658 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 42,718
will I still like it if I'm like uh idiot?
CelticBomber Offline
#659 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,781
8trackdisco wrote:
Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don't Know - Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell, host of the podcast Revisionist History and author of the number-one New York Times best seller Outliers, reinvents the audiobook in this immersive production of Talking to Strangers, a powerful examination of our interactions with people we don’t know.

Interesting theory, most of which I agree with.


I recently went on a Malcolm Gladwell tear. If you enjoyed Talking to Strangers as a read I would HIGHLY suggest you listen to the Audiobook format. He reads it himself and because of that you can hear him emphasize his thoughts in a way you may not have reading it yourself. I just finished rereading The Tipping Point. You might enjoy that as well.
CelticBomber Offline
#660 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,781
8trackdisco wrote:
The guy does his homework, and documents everything with several individual stories. Some of it is stomach turning (Jerry Sandusky @ Pedd State) And others almost hard to fathom.

The two stories on young men and young woman with alcohol involved is a nightly disaster happening. That one looks to be truly hopeless. Unless people stop drinking in college.


These stories made me crazy. Especially the one where they were both blackout drunk yet, she had no responsibility and he was held 100% responsible. Both lives irreparably damaged because of other peoples preconceived shallow bullcrap.
Gene363 Offline
#661 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Beyond Valor: World War II's Ranger and Airborne Veterans Reveal the Heart of Combat

By Patrick K. O'Donnell

The stories right from the Veterans that did the fighting.

(Grit Warning) God bless the Veterans.

Quote:
From the first parachute drops in North Africa to the final battles in Germany, U.S. Ranger and Airborne troops saw the worst action of World War II. In Beyond Valor, Patrick O'Donnell, a pioneer of Internet-based “oral history” who has collected the first-person stories of hundreds of veterans on his online oral history project, re-creates the frontline experience in stunning detail, weaving together more than 650 “e-histories” and interviews into a seamless narrative.

From the first parachute drops in North Africa to the final battles in Germany, U.S. Ranger and Airborne troops saw the worst action of World War II. In Beyond Valor, Patrick O'Donnell, a pioneer of Internet-based “oral history” who has collected the first-person stories of hundreds of veterans on his online oral history project, re-creates the frontline experience in stunning detail, weaving together more than 650 “e-histories” and interviews into a seamless narrative.

In recollections filled with pain, poignancy, and pride, veterans chronicle the destruction of entire battalions, speak of their own personal scars, and pay tribute to their fallen colleagues. Beyond Valor brings to light the hidden horrors and uncelebrated heroics of a war fought by a now-vanishing generation and preserves them for all future generations.
Cereal City Cigar Smoker Offline
#662 Posted:
Joined: 03-30-2006
Posts: 14,587
Nothing like it in the world by Steven Ambrose - the story of the making of the transcontinental railroad.

Herfing
frankj1 Offline
#663 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 42,718
is there a Chinese translation available?
RMAN4443 Offline
#664 Posted:
Joined: 09-29-2016
Posts: 7,683
frankj1 wrote:
is there a Chinese translation available?

that would be Coolie...Anxious
frankj1 Offline
#665 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 42,718
you're a baaaad man.
Gene363 Offline
#666 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
The Woo Chang Clan said, "I can dig it, and the rest was history."
Gene363 Offline
#667 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Unlikely Liberators: The Men of the 100th and 442nd

By: Masayo Umezawa Duus, translated by Peter Duus

A good read that includes the backstory of many of the Japanese American soldiers that fought in Europe. These soldiers had to fight prejudice overcome questions about their loyalty to finally be allowed to fight and die for their country.

Quote:
Unlikely Liberators is the action-filled story of the men of the 100th Battalion and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. Not trusted to fight in the Pacific, these sons of Japanese immigrants were sent instead to the European theater. In the eyes of their own government and the Europeans they liberated, they were an unlikely group of fighting men. They nevertheless engaged the enemy with astonishing heroism, winning battle after battle at Anzio, Salerno, Cassino, and in the Vosges Mountains. At the end of the war, the 100th and the 442nd emerged as America’s most decorated units. They provided ample evidence of their patriotism to a country that had questioned their loyalty.

Masayo Duus begins her story with the formation of the Japanese American units, which were an outgrowth of America’s ambivalent attitude toward the entire Japanese American community at the outbreak of the war. She recounts their experiences in training and during the early battles in Italy, including the conflicts between Japanese American and Caucasian troops. The final part of the story focuses on the battle in the Vosges forest, where the 442nd fought fiercely to rescue the “lost battalion” of Texans hopelessly cut off by the enemy.

Based on extensive research in War Department archives and nearly three hundred interviews with veterans of the 100th and 442nd, Unlikely Liberators first appeared in serialized form in Japan, where it won the Bungeishunjusha Reader’s Prize. It is an absorbing and personalized account of young men suddenly separated from their families and friends, often confused and sometimes suspicious about what the army wanted from them. It portrays them as individuals confronting the multiple crises of war and social rejection and it shows that their greatest achievement was not their victory over a foreign enemy, but over prejudice at home. This book is a tribute to those men, who by their heroism reestablished for all Japanese Americans their personal dignity as full citizens in the country of their birth.
Gene363 Offline
#668 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
The Prision Called Hohenasperg

By: Arthur D. Jacobs

The Japanese were not the only group entered during WWII.

Quote:
Unknown to most Americans, more than 10,000 Germans and German Americans were interned in the United States during WWII. This story is about the internment of a young American and his family. He was born in the U.S.A. and the story tells of his perilous path from his home in Brooklyn to internment at Ellis Island, N.Y. and Crystal City, Texas, and imprisonment, after the war, at a place in Germany called Hohenasperg.

When he arrived in Germany in the dead of winter, he was transported to Hohenasperg in a frigid, stench-filled, locked, and heavily guarded, boxcar. Once in Hohenasperg, he was separated from his family and put in a prison cell. He was only twelve years old! He was treated like a Nazi by the U.S. Army guards and was told that if he didn't behave he would be killed. He tried to tell them he was an American, but they just told him to shut up. His fellow inmates included high-ranking officers of the Third Reich who were being held for interrogation and denazification.
Gene363 Offline
#669 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Requiem for Battleship Yamato


By: Mitsuru Yoshida

Mixes prose with a war story from the Japanese POV.

Quote:
Requiem for Battleship Yamato is Yoshida Mitsuru's story of his own experience as a junior naval officer aboard the fabled Japanese battleship as it set out on a last, desperate sortie in April 1945.
8trackdisco Offline
#670 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,594
Was told NOT to read Gone With the Wind because it is racist. I asked them if the book should be burned... like the Nazis did.

While she stuttered, I downloaded it onto the Kindle.
Plowboy221 Offline
#671 Posted:
Joined: 03-03-2013
Posts: 4,749
Hustler October 1989
Gene363 Offline
#672 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
8trackdisco wrote:
Was told NOT to read Gone With the Wind because it is racist. I asked them if the book should be burned... like the Nazis did.

While she stuttered, I downloaded it onto the Kindle.


I'm sure if some of the WWII books I'm reading were published today there would be problems, SMDH.
Gene363 Offline
#673 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Duel Under the Stars: The Memoir of a Luftwaffe Night Pilot in World War II

By Wilhelm Johnen

The story of a German night fighter pilot in WWII.

Quote:
Originally published in the 1975s Wilhelm Johnen's memoir as a Luftwaffe pilot, fighting against allied bombing raids, is as much adventure story as historical document.

There is action, bravery, loss, stories of the horrors of allied bombing on German cities, and stories of small victories against the unstoppable deluge of the allied bomber stream. While the story lacks any larger context as to the causes or righteousness of either side, Johnen is often candid about the futility of the German resistance.


Quote:
Wilhelm Johnen flew his first operational mission in July 1941, having completed his blind-flying training. In his first couple of years he brought down two enemy planes. The tally went up rapidly once the air war was escalated in spring 1943, when Air Marshal Arthur Harris of the RAF Bomber Command began the campaign dubbed the Battle of the Ruhr.

During this phrase of the war Johnen's successes were achieved against a 710-strong force of bombers. Johnen's further successes during Harris's subsequent Berlin offensive led to his promotion as Staffelkapitan (squadron leader) of Nachtjagdgeschwader and a move to Mainz. During a sortie from there, his Bf 110 was hit by return fire and he was forced to land in Switzerland. He and his crew were interned by the authorities. The Germans were deeply worried about leaving a sophisticatedly equipped night fighter and its important air crew in the hands of a foreign government, even if it was a neutral one. After negotiations involving G�ring, the prisoners were released.

Johnen's unit moved to Hungary and by October 1944 his score was standing at thirty-three aerial kills. His final one came in March the following year, once Johnen had moved back to Germany.
gummy jones Offline
#674 Posted:
Joined: 07-06-2015
Posts: 7,968
just got "chronicles of wasted time" by mudridge

im pumped to get into it
deadeyedick Offline
#675 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 15,033
Finished Talking To Strangers. Anyone want this hard copy book?

Now reading The Body (a guide to occupants) by Bill Bryson
Gene363 Offline
#676 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Ignition!: An Informal History of Liquid Rocket Propellants

By: John Drury Clark

I really enjoyed this book, the author explains things well and has a great sense of humor. I'm also happy I did not read this book back in my younger days when I liked to do experiments. Yes, there is some chemistry, but not tests.

Quote:
The story of the search for a rocket propellant which could be trusted to take man into space. This search was a hazardous enterprise carried out by rival labs who worked against the known laws of nature, with no guarantee of success or safety. Acclaimed scientist and sci-fi author John Drury Clark writes with irreverent and eyewitness immediacy about the development of the explosive fuels strong enough to negate the relentless restraints of gravity. The resulting volume is as much a memoir as a work of history, sharing a behind-the-scenes view of an enterprise which eventually took men to the moon, missiles to the planets, and satellites to outer space. A classic work in the history of science, and described as “a good book on rocket stuff…that’s a really fun one” by SpaceX founder Elon Musk, readers will want to get their hands on this influential classic, available for the first time in decades.
8trackdisco Offline
#677 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,594
Yes, I am now reading Gone With The Wind.
MACS Offline
#678 Posted:
Joined: 02-26-2004
Posts: 76,478
The Axe and the Throne - M.D. Ireman
MACS Offline
#679 Posted:
Joined: 02-26-2004
Posts: 76,478
8trackdisco wrote:
Yes, I am now reading Gone With The Wind.


Frankly, Russ... we don't give a damn.
8trackdisco Offline
#680 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,594
MACS wrote:
Frankly, Russ... we don't give a damn.


GOLD!

Gene363 Offline
#681 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Into the Rising Sun: In Their Own Words, World War II's Pacific Veterans Reveal the Heart of Combat

By: Patrick K. O'Donnell

The companion book to Beyond Valor by the same author.

(Grit Warning)

Quote:
Drawn from interviews with more than eight hundred veterans, a combat history of the Pacific War recreates the most crucial battles, from raids on remote Japanese outposts to the desperate fighting on Guadalcanal and in Burma.


In his award-winning book Beyond Valor, Patrick O'Donnell reveals the true nature of the European Theater in World War II, as told by those who survived. Now, with Into the Rising Sun, O'Donnell tells the story of the brutal Pacific War, based on hundreds of interviews spanning a decade. The men who fought their way across the Pacific during World War II had to possess something more than just courage. They faced a cruel, fanatical enemy in the Japanese, an enemy willing to use anything for victory, from kamikaze flights to human-guided torpedoes. Over the course of the war, Marines, paratroopers, and rangers spearheaded D-Day-sized beach assaults, encountered cannibalism, suffered friendly-fire incidents, and endured torture as prisoners of war. Though they are truly heroes, they claim no glory for themselves. As one soldier put it, "When somebody gets decorated, it's because a lot of other men died." By at last telling their stories, these men present a hard, unvarnished look at the war on the ground, a final gift from aging warriors who have already given so much. Only with these accounts can the true horror of the war in the Pacific be fully known. Together with detailed maps of each battle, Into the Rising Sun offers a complete yet deeply personal account of the war in the Pacific, and a ground-level view of some of history's most brutal combat.
fiddler898 Offline
#682 Posted:
Joined: 06-15-2009
Posts: 3,781
Just finished The Pale Faced Lie by David Crow. Harrowing.
Gene363 Offline
#683 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Twenty Million Tons Under the Sea: The Daring Capture of the U-505

By Daniel V. Gallery

The author address the background of the German and the US side of this capture and the submarine war in the Atlantic.

Quote:
Daniel Gallery, in his brilliant memoir, explains how he led Task Group 21.12 in the battle against the U-Boat threat.

Commanding the USS Guadalcanal he led his crew to sink three of these menacing submarines, but his greatest achievement was to capture the U-505 off the coast of Africa.

He was the first American officer to capture an enemy warship since the War of 1812, and this victory gave the United States Navy not only a great victory but also the codebooks, Enigma machine and other secret materials found on board critically assisted the Allied codebreakers.


Originally written in 1956 there is one elephant in the room that he never addresses, the British were reading the German submarine messages using captured Enigma machines. I believe at that time this part of WWII was still classified and the author assumed the credit went to ladies of the night talking to German sailors in Lorient, France.
Palama Offline
#684 Posted:
Joined: 02-05-2013
Posts: 20,267
Gene363 wrote:
A Higher Call

By Adam Makos with Larry Alexander

This is a great story about a German fighter pilot that spares an almost destroyed B17 and the wounded crew. The back story of the two pilots is excellent and gives a glimpse into life in prewar and war time Germany.



Thanks.

Just finished listening to the audiobook and recommended it to my friends. I listened mostly at night but was so wrapped into it that I finished it in 3 days...which meant a couple of late nights.

Also watched some video of Brown’s and Stigler’s interview when they finally met.
Gene363 Offline
#685 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Palama wrote:
Thanks.

Just finished listening to the audiobook and recommended it to my friends. I listened mostly at night but was so wrapped into it that I finished it in 3 days...which meant a couple of late nights.

Also watched some video of Brown’s and Stigler’s interview when they finally met.


You are quite welcome, it is a great story and inside into the lives opposing soldiers. I had not see the video of their meeting. I have purchased some books from Valor Studios and they have this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8EkmyoG83Q

Another video of this story: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_lp9-cN_Oog


It is fascinating to peer into the thoughts of soldiers, from both sides, during and after war.
Gene363 Offline
#686 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Okinawa: The Last Battle of World War II

By Robert Leckie

An in depth look into the last battle of WWII, from the planning and support to the actual front line battle experiences, including many Medal of Honor recipients.

Quote:
Former Marine and Pacific War veteran Robert Leckie tells the story of the invasion of Okinawa, the closing battle of World War II. Leckie is a skilled military historian, mixing battle strategy and analysis with portraits of the men who fought on both sides to give the reader a complete account of the invasion. Lasting 83 days and surpassing D-Day in both troops and material used, the Battle of Okinawa was a decisive victory for the Allies, and a huge blow to Japan. In this stirring and readable account, Leckie provides a complete picture of the battle and its context in the larger war.
Gene363 Offline
#687 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Pacific Alamo

By John Wukovits

The gripping story of the defenders of Wake from the Japanese, both the military, Marines, Navy and Army as well as civilian construction workers building improvement on the island. The book also covers what happened to the defenders after the battle.

In addition to the battle for Wake, the author covers the history of the island and the world leading up to WWII.

Quote:
It happened in the shadow of Pearl Harbor—mere hours after the first attack on the day that would “live in infamy.” But few know the full story of Wake Island.

Now a prominent military historian, breaking new ground on the assault, relates the compelling events of that day and the heroic struggle that followed. Thanks to the brave Marines stationed there-and the civilian construction workers who selflessly put their lives on the line to defend the island-what was supposed to be an easy victory became a protracted and costly battle for Imperial Japan. This is the story of that battle, from survivors on both sides, and with a gallery of historic photos.
Gene363 Offline
#688 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Into the ABYSS

By: Carol Shaben

Story of survival, both a crash in frozen woods and in the aftermath, four survivors were never the same. Well written and an interesting read.

Quote:
On an icy night in October 1984, a Piper Navajo commuter plane carrying 9 passengers crashed in the remote wilderness of northern Alberta, killing 6 people. Four survived: the rookie pilot, a prominent politician, a cop, and the criminal he was escorting to face charges. Despite the poor weather, Erik Vogel, the 24-year-old pilot, was under intense pressure to fly--a situation not uncommon to pilots working for small airlines. Overworked and exhausted, he feared losing his job if he refused to fly. Larry Shaben, the author's father and Canada's first Muslim Cabinet Minister, was commuting home after a busy week at the Alberta Legislature. After Paul Archambault, a drifter wanted on an outstanding warrant, boarded the plane, rookie Constable Scott Deschamps decided, against RCMP regulations, to remove his handcuffs--a decision that profoundly impacted the men's survival. As they fought through the night to stay alive, the dividing lines of power, wealth and status were erased and each man was forced to confront the precious and limited nature of his existence. The survivors forged unlikely friendships and through them found strength and courage to rebuild their lives. Into the Abyss is a powerful narrative that combines in-depth reporting with sympathy and grace to explore how a single, tragic event can upset our assumptions and become a catalyst for transformation.
Gene363 Offline
#689 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Murder in the Midlands: Larry Gene Bell and the 28 Days of Terror that Shook South Carolina

By Rita Y. Shuler

A quick read about a sick SOB that kidnapped two young women and how he was caught, tried and ended.

Quote:
Former South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED) forensic photographer Lieutenant Rita Y. Shuler leads us through the twenty-eight days of terror and shocking events of one of the most notorious double murders and manhunts in South Carolina history. Shuler shares her own personal interactions with some of the key players in this famous manhunt and investigation. Also included are Bell’s chilling calls from area phone booths to the Smith family, along with his disconcerting interviews and bizarre actions in the courtroom, which show the dark, evil and criminal mind of this horrific killer. This case has been featured on the Discovery Channel’s FBI Files, episode “Cat and Mouse,” and in the CBS movie Nightmare in Columbia County, which can still be seen on Lifetime TV. It currently runs as the episode “Last Will” on Court TV’s Forensic Files.
Gene363 Offline
#690 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Stuka Pilot

By Hans-Ulrich Rudel, Lynton Hudson (Translator)


The story of Germanies number one Stuka dive bomber pilot. Mostly in the battles with Russia. Just the facts, from the pilot's POV. Rudel, to his death, was an avid supporter of Hitler, but the book is about flying and battle tactics.

Quote:
Hans Ulrich Rudel was a Stuka dive-bomber pilot during World War 2. The most highly decorated German serviceman of the war, Rudel was one of only 27 military men to be awarded the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds.
Rudel flew 2,530 combat missions claiming a total of 2,000 targets destroyed, including 800 vehicles, 519 tanks, 150 artillery pieces, a destroyer, two cruisers, one battleship, 70 landing craft, 4 armored trains, several bridges and nine aircraft which he shot down.
Gene363 Offline
#691 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Blind Man's Bluff The Untold Story Of American Submarine Espionage

By Sherry Sontag, Christopher Drew and Annette Lawrence Drew

I really enjoyed reading this book. I chose it to learn about the US wiretapping USSR underwater communications cables, but the covers much more clandestine submarine surveillance of the USSR during the cold war.

Quote:
Discover the secret history of America's submarine warfare in this fast-paced and deeply researched chronicle of adventure and intrigue during the Cold War that reads like a spy thriller.

Blind Man's Bluff is an exciting, epic story of adventure, ingenuity, courage, and disaster beneath the sea. This New York Times bestseller reveals previously unknown dramas, such as:

The mission to send submarines wired with self-destruct charges into the heart of Soviet seas to tap crucial underwater telephone cables.How the Navy's own negligence may have been responsible for the loss of the USS Scorpion, a submarine that disappeared, all hands lost, in 1968.The bitter war between the CIA and the Navy and how it threatened to sabotage one of America's most important undersea missions.The audacious attempt to steal a Soviet submarine with the help of eccentric billionaire Howard Hughes, and how it was doomed from the start.

A magnificent achievement in investigative reporting, Blind Man's Bluff reads like a spy thriller, but with one important difference -- everything in it is true.
jetblasted Offline
#692 Posted:
Joined: 08-30-2004
Posts: 42,595
2020 Book Buys:

Other Voices, Other Rooms by Truman Capote
Reflections in a Golden Eye by Carson McCullers
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil - Berendt
Lady from Savannah: The Life of Juliette Low
Minnie Pearl ( An Autobiography )
Peachtree Road by Anne Rivers Siddons
Backyard Chickens: A Practical Handbook
The Book of Enoch
Memorial Addresses on the Life and Character of Benjamin Harvey Hill
Memorial Addresses on the Life and Character of Charles Frederick Crisp
The Political Career of Eugene Talmadge - Anderson
Hoke Smith and the Politics of the New South
The Boys from Corbin by Gary P. West
Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There; and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (Two Volumes)
BRAVE NEW WORLD by Aldous Huxley
One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Solzhenitsyn
The Gulag Archipelago by Alexandr I. Solzhenitsyn
The German Revolution 1918-1919 by Ralph Lutz
The Russian Revolution 1917-1921, Volumes I & II
The Weimar Republic Overture to the Third Reich
The Forrestal Diaries by Walter Millis
The Life of Stephen A Douglas by James Sheahan
The Life and Times of the Rev John Wesley by Tyerman
Life and Labors of Francis Asbury by George Smith
The Life of Charles Wesley by Thomas Jackson
The Life and Times of Samuel Wesley - Tyerman
SUSANNA WESLEY by Eliza Clarke
The Life of Rev. Thomas Coke by Samuel Drew
Memoirs of Rev. George Whitefield by John Gillies
Sermons on Several Occasions by John Wesley
JOURNALS of REV. JOHN WESLEY VOLS. I - VIII

Currently reading Backyard Chickens. My Fort Knox of a Chicken Coop is being delivered tomorrow. I hope all y’all are doing well. I see not much has changed around this place.
Gene363 Offline
#693 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Derek! Long time no post. Applause
deadeyedick Offline
#694 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 15,033
The Next Great Migration by Sonia Shah

The great migration of displaced peoples due to climate change has started
havanaone Offline
#695 Posted:
Joined: 11-24-2004
Posts: 5,472
Atkins Diabetes, it's a long read...
CelticBomber Offline
#696 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,781
Theft By Finding - David Sedaris
American Nations - Collin Woodward
Mythos - Stephen Fry
Medieval Europe - Chris Wickham
A History of Eastern Europe - Vejas Gabriel Liulevicius
The History of the Renaissance World - Susan Wise Bauer
Understanding the Dark Side of Human Nature - Professor Daniel Breyer
The Graveyard Book - Neil Gaimon
Madness from the Inconstant Moon - Larry Niven ( Short Story Collection)
The Heart of a Goof - P.G. Wodehouse (9 Short stories about golfing) "It was a morning when all nature shouted "Fore!" I don't golf but, I hung on every word. This guy can write.
The Story of Philosophy - Will Durant

shaun341 Offline
#697 Posted:
Joined: 08-02-2012
Posts: 8,826
Start with Why by Simon Sinek

Such a popular read but I'm having a hard time getting through it. 2/3rds done though and hoping next one is a little more interesting and not a repetitive story about Apple.
Sunoverbeach Offline
#698 Posted:
Joined: 08-11-2017
Posts: 13,221
The long awaited next two books in Butcher's Dresden Chronicles. Total fluff but highly entertaining
rydnfree Offline
#699 Posted:
Joined: 11-22-2011
Posts: 1
The splendid and the vile
Johnnykid Offline
#700 Posted:
Joined: 01-16-2019
Posts: 3
http://mileswmathis.com/lincoln.pdf
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