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Last post 7 days ago by Palama. 893 replies replies.
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What are you reading?
Palama Offline
#851 Posted:
Joined: 02-05-2013
Posts: 20,890
Gangsters of Capitalism
Smedley Butler, The Marines and the Making and Breaking of America’s Empire
By Jonathan M. Katz
deadeyedick Offline
#852 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 15,284
Brief History of Equality ~ Thomas Piketty

Cliff notes: The rich have too much so lets take it
deadeyedick Offline
#853 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 15,284
Unsettled (What climate science tells us, what it doesn't, and why it matters)

~ Steven E Koonin former Undersecretary for Science, U.S. Department Of Energy

Cliff notes: A very critical look at the real science behind the the IPCC Assesments.
Gene363 Offline
#854 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 29,045
Jeb! and the Bush Crime Family
The Inside Story of an American Dynasty

By Roger Stone and Saint John Hunt
delta1 Offline
#855 Posted:
Joined: 11-23-2011
Posts: 27,657
The Secret History, Donna Tartt...good story about a group of college friends at a small New England college in the 70's, who kill a stranger and then unravel...
deadeyedick Offline
#856 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 15,284
The Only Investment Guide You'll Ever Need ( revised 2022 ed.)

~Andrew Tobias

Think I first read this in around '80. He still writes some very funny and smart chit.

First chapter is titled "If I'm so smart, how come this book won't make you rich?"
CelticBomber Offline
#857 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,786
The 18th Brumaire of Louis Bonparte - Carl Marx
The Making of the English Working Class - E. P. Thompson

Up next

Lizabeth Cohen - Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919 - 1939

Edit: My bad. Sorry RayR.
deadeyedick Offline
#858 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 15,284
CelticBomber wrote:
The 18th Brumaire of Louis Bonparte - Carl Marx
The Making of the English Working Class - E. P. Thompson

Up next

Lizabeth Cohen - Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919 - 1939

Actually looking forward to a RayR post once he looks up these books and understands what they are about!

Just kidding. We all know RayR doesn't read. Think



Well, this took a dark turn.............................

Keep the politics out of this section ya basted!
Uromastyx Offline
#859 Posted:
Joined: 04-09-2022
Posts: 1
Biography of Judge Isaac Parker

Political history of the Cherokee Nation

Gene363 Offline
#860 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 29,045
8trackdisco wrote:
The guy does his homework, and documents everything with several individual stories. Some of it is stomach turning (Jerry Sandusky @ Pedd State) And others almost hard to fathom.

The two stories on young men and young woman with alcohol involved is a nightly disaster happening. That one looks to be truly hopeless. Unless people stop drinking in college.


CelticBomber wrote:
These stories made me crazy. Especially the one where they were both blackout drunk yet, she had no responsibility and he was held 100% responsible. Both lives irreparably damaged because of other peoples preconceived shallow bullcrap.



I am currently reading, Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know About the People We Don't Know - Malcolm Gladwell. I just ordered an extra copy for the parents of a teenage daughter, holly cow!

I also ordered The Tipping Point and Blink.

CelticBomber Offline
#861 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,786
Goldenaudiobooks.com if you want tons of free audiobooks. It's web based though. You listen through their webpage and not an app. Free is free though;-)

I've loved all of Malcolm Gladwell's books. I have "I Hate the Ivy League" up next. You would enjoy his book "Outliers: The Story of Success" too.

The Madness of Crowds by Douglas Murray is a recent one I really liked. He's an English author and political commentator who leans just right of center. This book is about Wokism and Identity politics. He's not a fan. I've watched him in many debates and he's always well thought out and reasonable.
RayR Offline
#862 Posted:
Joined: 07-20-2020
Posts: 6,751
CelticBomber wrote:
The 18th Brumaire of Louis Bonparte - Carl Marx
The Making of the English Working Class - E. P. Thompson

Up next

Lizabeth Cohen - Making a New Deal: Industrial Workers in Chicago, 1919 - 1939

Edit: My bad. Sorry RayR.


I always knew you liked COMMIE books. BTW...you spelled Karl Marx wrong.
CelticBomber Offline
#863 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,786
RayR wrote:
I always knew you liked COMMIE books. BTW...you spelled Karl Marx wrong.


In order to object to an idea you should first understand what you're actually objecting too. You can then make informed arguments when you are questioned on why you object. I read a lot of books with idea's I reject. It allows me to question the things I believe and either reinforce my stance or shift my stance based on new information. It's called being reasonable. You should try it.

Sorry I brought this here everyone.
Gene363 Offline
#864 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 29,045
CelticBomber wrote:
Goldenaudiobooks.com if you want tons of free audiobooks. It's web based though. You listen through their webpage and not an app. Free is free though;-)

I've loved all of Malcolm Gladwell's books. I have "I Hate the Ivy League" up next. You would enjoy his book "Outliers: The Story of Success" too.

The Madness of Crowds by Douglas Murray is a recent one I really liked. He's an English author and political commentator who leans just right of center. This book is about Wokism and Identity politics. He's not a fan. I've watched him in many debates and he's always well thought out and reasonable.


I'll take a look, thanks for the recommendations.

CelticBomber wrote:
In order to object to an idea you should first understand what you're actually objecting too. You can then make informed arguments when you are questioned on why you object. I read a lot of books with idea's I reject. It allows me to question the things I believe and either reinforce my stance or shift my stance based on new information. It's called being reasonable. You should try it.

Sorry I brought this here everyone.


No sorry required, especially not about spelling, FFS. Sipping tea

I've always believed if you cannot argue the other side's position, you probably don't know what you're talking about.
RayR Offline
#865 Posted:
Joined: 07-20-2020
Posts: 6,751
CelticBomber wrote:
In order to object to an idea you should first understand what you're actually objecting too. You can then make informed arguments when you are questioned on why you object. I read a lot of books with idea's I reject. It allows me to question the things I believe and either reinforce my stance or shift my stance based on new information. It's called being reasonable. You should try it.

Sorry I brought this here everyone.


Sure..Sure comrade, I understand. Wink

Got any good RIGHTY books you can recommend?
rfenst Offline
#866 Posted:
Joined: 06-23-2007
Posts: 37,327
Gene363 wrote:
I've always believed if you cannot argue the other side's position, you probably don't know what you're talking about.

So very, very, very true. There are only two sides to any argument and usually only one is right. Didacticism is a necessity evil.
RayR Offline
#867 Posted:
Joined: 07-20-2020
Posts: 6,751
rfenst wrote:
So very, very, very true. There are only two sides to any argument and usually only one is right. Didacticism is a necessity evil.


Not true...what if there are more than two sides to an argument?
Gene363 Offline
#868 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 29,045
RayR wrote:
Not true...what if there are more than two sides to an argument?


Still true, just more work, and the possibility of learning something new.
8trackdisco Offline
#869 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,891
Lennon, Dylan, Alice, & Jesus
The Spiritual Biography of Rock and Roll
Greg Laurie & Marshall Terrill
Jakethesnake86 Offline
#870 Posted:
Joined: 12-29-2020
Posts: 2,672
A painted house John Grisham
Jakethesnake86 Offline
#871 Posted:
Joined: 12-29-2020
Posts: 2,672
Recommend me a great war book. Preferably ww2 ??
8trackdisco Offline
#872 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,891
Jakethesnake86 wrote:
Recommend me a great war book. Preferably ww2 ??


Really liked this one.

https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Conquerors/Michael-R-Beschloss/9780743244541

New York Times bestseller, The Conquerors reveals how Franklin Roosevelt's and Harry Truman's private struggles with their aides and Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin affected the unfolding of the Holocaust and the fate of vanquished Nazi Germany.

With monumental fairness and balance, The Conquerors shows how Roosevelt privately refused desperate pleas to speak out directly against the Holocaust, to save Jewish refugees, and to explore the possible bombing of Auschwitz to stop the killing. The book also shows FDR's fierce will to ensure that Germany would never threaten the world again. Near the end of World War II, he abruptly endorsed the secret plan of his friend, Treasury Secretary Henry Morgenthau, to reduce the Germans to a primitive existence—despite Churchill's fear that crushing postwar Germany would let the Soviets conquer the continent. The book finally shows how, after FDR's death, President Truman rebelled against Roosevelt's tough approach and adopted the Marshall Plan and other more conciliatory policies that culminated in today's democratic, united Europe.

As Presidents Roosevelt and Truman led the United States in World War II in Europe, they dealt with the question of what kind of government should be imposed on Nazi Germany to ensure that Germany could never again drag the world into war. The Conquerors tells the story with much intimate detail and color of how FDR and Truman privately struggled in their own minds and with titanic allies like Winston Churchill and Josef Stalin, through summits and secret messages, to answer that question.
=====

If you are looking for books on the combat itself, the above isn’t a great option.
Gene363 Offline
#873 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 29,045
Jakethesnake86 wrote:
Recommend me a great war book. Preferably ww2 ??


Army, Navy, Planes, Europe, Pacific? Battles Vs personal stories?

This one is excellent:

With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa

Eugene B. Sledge
,
Paul Fussell (Contributor)

Quote:
In his own book, Wartime, Paul Fussell called With the Old Breed "one of the finest memoirs to emerge from any war." John Keegan referred to it in The Second World War as "one of the most arresting documents in war literature." And Studs Terkel was so fascinated with the story he interviewed its author for his book, "The Good War." What has made E.B. Sledge's memoir of his experience fighting in the South Pacific during World War II so devastatingly powerful is its sheer honest simplicity and compassion.

Now including a new introduction by Paul Fussell, With the Old Breed presents a stirring, personal account of the vitality and bravery of the Marines in the battles at Peleliu and Okinawa. Born in Mobile, Alabama in 1923 and raised on riding, hunting, fishing, and a respect for history and legendary heroes such as George Washington and Daniel Boone, Eugene Bondurant Sledge (later called "Sledgehammer" by his Marine Corps buddies) joined the Marines the year after the bombing of Pearl Harbor and from 1943 to 1946 endured the events recorded in this book. In those years, he passed, often painfully, from innocence to experience.

Sledge enlisted out of patriotism, idealism, and youthful courage, but once he landed on the beach at Peleliu, it was purely a struggle for survival. Based on the notes he kept on slips of paper tucked secretly away in his New Testament, he simply and directly recalls those long months, mincing no words and sparing no pain. The reality of battle meant unbearable heat, deafening gunfire, unimaginable brutality and cruelty, the stench of death, and, above all, constant fear. Sledge still has nightmares about "the bloody, muddy month of May on Okinawa." But, as he also tellingly reveals, the bonds of friendship formed then will never be severed.

Sledge's honesty and compassion for the other marines, even complete strangers, sets him apart as a memoirist of war. Read as sobering history or as high adventure, With the Old Breed is a moving chronicle of action and courage.

Gene363 Offline
#874 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 29,045
Jakethesnake86 wrote:
Recommend me a great war book. Preferably ww2 ??


The author of many historical books, Robert Leckie was an excellent writer with a long list of books.

Helmet for My Pillow
by Robert Leckie

Quote:
Now the inspiration behind the HBO series THE PACIFIC

Here is one of the most riveting first-person accounts to ever come out of the Second World War. Robert Leckie was 21 when he enlisted in the US Marine Corps in January 1942. In Helmet for My Pillow we follow his journey, from boot camp on Parris Island, South Carolina, all the way to the raging battles in the Pacific, where some of the war's fiercest fighting took place. Recounting his service with the 1st Marine Division and the brutal action on Guadalcanal, New Britain and Peleliu, Leckie spares no detail of the horrors and sacrifice of war, painting an unsentimental portrait of how real warriors are made, fight, and all too often die in the defence of their country.

From the live-for-today rowdiness of Marines on leave to the terrors of jungle warfare against an enemy determined to fight to the last man, Leckie describes what it's really like when victory can only be measured inch by bloody inch. Unparalleled in its immediacy and accuracy, Helmet for My Pillow is a gripping account from an ordinary soldier fighting in extraordinary conditions. This is a book that brings you as close to the mud, the blood, and the experience of war as it is safe to come.
Jakethesnake86 Offline
#875 Posted:
Joined: 12-29-2020
Posts: 2,672
I’ll check it out gene thanks
Jakethesnake86 Offline
#876 Posted:
Joined: 12-29-2020
Posts: 2,672
Bought that book gene. Should be here in a couple days. See how my free time lines up but it’s next on my read list
Stogie1020 Offline
#877 Posted:
Joined: 12-19-2019
Posts: 3,966
Just finished "Putin's Playbook" by Rebekah Koffler.

Very informative, albeit a touch repetitive.

Author is a Russian-born, former US DIA analyst. Parts of the book are litterally redacted by the DIA.
Palama Offline
#878 Posted:
Joined: 02-05-2013
Posts: 20,890
Born Standing Up
A Comic’s Life

By Steve Martin

Cheating. Listening to the audiobook. While I enjoy reading, the ease of putting on the CDs while I’m out in the garage smoking a cigar makes it a no-brainer. Of course I can’t do it for every book but when available I’ll get it instead.
Stogie1020 Offline
#879 Posted:
Joined: 12-19-2019
Posts: 3,966
Smarter Better Faster
- Charles Duhigg
Palama Offline
#880 Posted:
Joined: 02-05-2013
Posts: 20,890
Audiobook again.

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck
A Counterintuitive Approach to Living a Good Life

Mark Manson
Palama Offline
#881 Posted:
Joined: 02-05-2013
Posts: 20,890
Audiobook

Schindler's List by Thomas Keneally

I love the movie but wanted to learn more about Schindler.

Review taken from bookishelf.com:

Thomas Keneally’s Schindler’s List (or Schindler’s Ark) is an account of how the Nazi member and industrialist Oskar Schindler rescued over a thousand Jews from very probable death from at Auschwitz, by protecting them as workers at his enamel ware factory. Thomas Keneally won the Man Booker Prize for Schindler’s List in 1982.

Schindler’s List by Thomas Keneally is a true demonstration of courage and integrity that people should have followed during WWII. This story tells about the lives of the Jewish people in Poland during WWII and how by one man. Over 1200 Jew’s lives were saved by Oscar Schindler, a business man from Czechoslovakia. Oscar Schindler acquainted himself with power members of the Nazi party in order to build up favors in case he ever needed them. Jews were being forced to register and wear a yellow Star of David in order to distinguish themselves from the rest of society. Soldiers would cut off their side curls in the street to make a mockery of them.

“Whoever saves one life, saves the world entire.”

As the German occupation increased, Jewish residents were tossed out of their homes and forced to all live in a 16 square block walled ghetto located south of the Vistula River in Poland. The liquidation of the ghetto lead by Amon Goeth, Nazi officer, forced everyone out of their occupancy and into the Plaszow forced labour camp. Oskar Schindler with the help of Itzhak Stern, a member of the Jewish community, set up a metal works plant so that the Jews were able to escape, if only for a moment, from the brutality of the concentration camp where they were forced to fight for survival. His factory was known to all who worked there as a piece of heaven in the depths of hell.

Schindler strike a deal with Amon that included Amon receive a said amount of the profits that came in for the labour that was required to run the factory. Amon let it slip to Oscar that he was ordered to send all the prisoners to Auschwitz where they would ultimately face death. With this horrifying news, Schindler set out on a mission to save those who had become so dear to his heart.

“The principle was, death should not be entered like some snug harbor. It should be an unambiguous refusal to surrender.”

The story of Oscar Schindler is one that would not be easily forgotten. This man saved the lives of 1200 Jews and their descendants who would have other wise been killed in the massacre of WWII. Although this is a great story of survival, it gets you thinking about all the other people who weren’t as lucky to have worked for such a man. Thousands of Jews died in the worst conditions possible and for those who did survive, they faced the memories of the suffering and the violence that happened before their eyes.

It was inspiring to see Schindler when his mind set changed from making money to saving lives. Itzhak Stern had a huge part to play in the conversion of Schindler because he was in charge of the factory, so he was the one who did all the hiring. Stern worked relentlessly in making sure that as many people as possible were able to come to the ‘place of refuge.’ Schindler created a future for so many who thought there was nothing else for them.

“He was one of those men who, even in the years of peace, would have advised his congregation that while God may well be honored by the inflexibility of the pious, he might also be honored by the flexibility of the sensible.”

Steven Spielberg’s film by the same name has made the book Schindler’s List and the tale world famous so there probably is little need to outline the plot. Possibly one of the most memorable scenes in the film, partly because of the iconic girl in a red coat, the liquidation of Jewish ghetto in Krakow is, similarly, a quite brilliantly described moment in the book. Much of it is seen from the point of view of Oscar Schindler who has a high vantage point on top of a hill overlooking the town, while out riding. He notices the girl and is appalled that the violence he is witnessing is being carried out in full view of an innocent child.

There is a revelatory moment for Schindler as realizes that this is not just a few out of control soldiers but officially sanctioned actions. The soldiers do not expect to face consequences. He is shocked and sickened, and his response is a reminder for the reader of the problems of hindsight.

delta1 Offline
#882 Posted:
Joined: 11-23-2011
Posts: 27,657
almost ashamed of the shallowness of my reading list...last three I've read

Brother Odd, Dean Koontz
Hidden Order, Brad Thor
finishing: Eye of the Needle, Ken Follett
Jakethesnake86 Offline
#883 Posted:
Joined: 12-29-2020
Posts: 2,672
^ I can read anything that I find entertaining. I don’t need any real depth. I can go any different direction but it better be good.

Been reading a helmet for my pillow
Speyside2 Offline
#884 Posted:
Joined: 11-11-2021
Posts: 2,134
A Russian Gentleman in Moscow-Amor Towles.
Sunoverbeach Offline
#885 Posted:
Joined: 08-11-2017
Posts: 13,932
No shame, Delta. Brother Odd was highly entertaining IMO
Stogie1020 Offline
#886 Posted:
Joined: 12-19-2019
Posts: 3,966
Eye of the Needle (really anything Follett) was great!
PapaWhiskey Offline
#887 Posted:
Joined: 01-01-2023
Posts: 57
delta1 wrote:
almost ashamed of the shallowness of my reading list...last three I've read

Brother Odd, Dean Koontz
Hidden Order, Brad Thor
finishing: Eye of the Needle, Ken Follett


I enjoyed all the Odd Thomas books on audio.
Mraia Offline
#888 Posted:
Joined: 04-18-2019
Posts: 113
A Confederacy of Dunces
PapaWhiskey Offline
#889 Posted:
Joined: 01-01-2023
Posts: 57
Convergence by Craig Alanson, Narrated by R.C. Bray.
Really funny especially if you've ever had a dog. Good book by Alanson and R.C. Bray is an excellent narrator.

https://www.audible.com/pd/Convergence-Audiobook/B09ZZ8VMKL
PapaWhiskey Offline
#890 Posted:
Joined: 01-01-2023
Posts: 57
Here are a few I've reread several times and worth while every time.

Rich Dad Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki
https://www.audible.com/pd/Rich-Dad-Poor-Dad-Audiobook/B008BT3C1Q

The Richest Man in Babylon by George Clason
https://www.audible.com/pd/The-Richest-Man-in-Babylon-Audiobook/B00DC8GDVC

The Goal by Eliyahu Goldratt (The Phoenix Project by Gene Kim is also excellent)
https://www.audible.com/pd/The-Goal-Audiobook/B00IFG88SM
Stogie1020 Offline
#891 Posted:
Joined: 12-19-2019
Posts: 3,966
Rise and Kill First- Ronen Bergman

A very detailed history of Israel's targeted assassination programs.
delta1 Offline
#892 Posted:
Joined: 11-23-2011
Posts: 27,657
Why Nations Go To War, John G. Stoessinger, discusses the wars of the 20th century and the people who started them.
Palama Offline
#893 Posted:
Joined: 02-05-2013
Posts: 20,890
Okinawa - The Last Battle of World War II
Robert Leckie

Thanks to Gene for recommending this author.

My FIL served as an interpreter during the Okinawa campaign. One night I asked him about his experience in the war and in a tone and look that told me we would never talk about it again, he said, “You see things you never want to see again.” He has since passed on so kinda reading this in his honor.
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