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Speysides wine corner
Speyside Offline
#1 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2015 Bodega Elena de Mendoza Malbec, Mendoza, Argentina. 87 points, 9 to 13 dollars. This Malbec is rich and well structured with flavors of blackberry, plum, and chocolate. Soft rounded tannins carry from the mid palate through the plush and velvety finish. It has a pleasant nose of blackberry, dark cherry, and a hint of mocha.
DrafterX Offline
#2 Posted:
Joined: 10-18-2005
Posts: 86,629
ThumpUp
SmokeMonkey Offline
#3 Posted:
Joined: 04-05-2015
Posts: 4,867
I'm going to need to keep a list to carry with me....
bassman45 Offline
#4 Posted:
Joined: 07-05-2009
Posts: 3,837
Finally something on CBID my wife will like!🙌
deadeyedick Offline
#5 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 9,579
bassman45 wrote:
Finally something on CBID my wife will like!🙌


And mine. We have travelled to almost every AVA in the western states tasting their wines over many years but have not acquired nearly the knowledge (or maybe the tastes) as Spey.
gummy jones Offline
#6 Posted:
Joined: 07-06-2015
Posts: 6,497
You had me at bodega
Speyside Offline
#7 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2014 Dona Paula Estate Malbec, Uco Valley, Mendoza, Argentina

Wine Enthusiast review, spot on. 89 points $9 to $14.

High-elevation aromas of blueberry, herbs and bramble are accented by cumin and spiced-plum notes. This displays ample size and grip, while flavors of roasted plum and savory spices are earthy. On the finish, this is oaky and minty tasting.
SmokeMonkey Offline
#8 Posted:
Joined: 04-05-2015
Posts: 4,867
Spey, how do malbecs hold up to aging?
Speyside Offline
#9 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
Quite well. Easily 5 years, often 10 years. The 1st I mentioned 5 years, the second I mentioned 10 years. The second is availible nation wide. I think it is outstanding.
SmokeMonkey Offline
#10 Posted:
Joined: 04-05-2015
Posts: 4,867
I'll be on the lookout. Thanks!
Buckwheat Offline
#11 Posted:
Joined: 04-15-2004
Posts: 11,605
SmokeMonkey wrote:
I'm going to need to keep a list to carry with me....


Try the Wine Enthusiast phone app. Seems to work pretty well and it's free.
Speyside Offline
#12 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
Agreed.
SmokeMonkey Offline
#13 Posted:
Joined: 04-05-2015
Posts: 4,867
Thanks, guys. While I'm not drinking much due to dieting, my intention is to buy a few cases I can lay down and enjoy - mainly big reds but maybe a few ageable sauvignon blancs as well.
Speyside Offline
#14 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2015 Nobilo Icon sauvignon blanc, Marlborough, New Zealand.

A stunning sauvignon blanc. More reserved and eligant than most. A nose of lemon zest and citrus fruit. Flavors of lime, mango, and guava. A great warm weather sipper. Give it a heavy chill due to the acidity level. A very refreshing wine that also works great as a digestive. $12 ish. Will pair nicely with chicken, fish, mollusks, and goat cheese. About 88 points.
jjanecka Offline
#15 Posted:
Joined: 12-08-2015
Posts: 3,813
Might have to look around for this one. I love most of the wine I've tried from NZ and South Africa. Huge fan of the Savignon blancs from Moulderbosch in South Africa. The owner is a pretty avid cigar smoker and at one point modeled his wine labels to look like cigar bands.
TMCTLT Offline
#16 Posted:
Joined: 11-22-2007
Posts: 19,688


Lovin this Allen!!! Look forward to this becoming a regular thing Beer


Good on ya's for moving to care for your folks, And Congrats on the new job buddy Applause
Speyside Offline
#17 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
Thank you Paul.
Speyside Offline
#18 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2015, Stonefly Chardonay, Russian River Valley, California.

$8, 87 points.

Crisp, clean, and refreshing. Probably done in stainless steel. Lemon and pear on the nose with a hint of minerality. Flavors of lemon, lime, and white peach. Notes of minerality, and acidity. A great seafood Chardonay., also great sipping on its own. Very Chablis like in character. Definitely a bargin.
Speyside Offline
#19 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2014, Chateau Sansonnet, Saint Emilion, Bordeaux, France.

94 points $26.99

Fantastic wine. Classic Saint Emilion. Nose of dark dense berrys, cassis, minerality, and cedar. Tremendous structure, soft elegant tannins, easily 2 minutes of finish. Dense blackberry and black raspberry fruit. Very complex an front, mid and back palate. A serious wine. Will go great with a steak.
SmokeMonkey Offline
#20 Posted:
Joined: 04-05-2015
Posts: 4,867
That sounds phenomenal.
frankj1 Offline
#21 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 24,961
wow!
Speyside Offline
#22 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2011, Neri Gattinara, Piedmont, Italy.

92 points, $19.99

Great wine. A nose of candied cherry, anise, spice, and Arturo Fuente Hemingway tobacco. Smooth and silky. Complex from start to finish. Elegant and supple. Flavors of Queen Anne cherry, garrigue, Dominican cigar tobacco, and wild mushroom. So unique and we'll worth seeking out.
Stinkdyr Offline
#23 Posted:
Joined: 06-16-2009
Posts: 9,921
Riddle me this, Dr. Speyside.....

What is up with this ridonkulous obno trend of Rose All Day?
Seriously, I have had MAYBE 2 of them I liked.......the rest are sub-meh.

I guess rose is this year's Malbec.

Not talking
Speyside Offline
#24 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
Rose is a great type of wine in its place. If you want refreshing with red wine flavors it is a great way to go. Though they will be red wine flavors of light red wines. Every wine region produces its own style of rose. If you do not like acidity in your wine you will not like rose. Also, rose is not a wine to pair with red meat. It is for seafood, chicken, and other light dishes. It is a nice sipper on its own. I do not like roses from Italy and South America in general because they are often off dry to sweet. Try a rose from Provence in France, they are everything a rose should be. If you don't like that one you probably wont like any rose. By the way, roses have been around hundreds of years, they were not well known here.
Speyside Offline
#25 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2015, Tenuta Sant Antonio Scaia Veneto Gargenaga-Chardonnay, Delle Venize, Italy

80% Gargenega, 20% Chardonnay
$12, 90 points

Gooseberry, quince, grapefruit, and granny smith apple on the nose. It feels frizzante ( semi sparkling ) on the palate but is not. Flavors or ruby red grapefruit, peach, granny smith apple, and white pear, Soft acidity with an interesting minerality. A nice finish of citrus, and apple. This is a wow wine. I can't believe it is so reasonably priced. Gargenaga is the primary grape in Soave. In this wine the whole is greater than the parts. Also the is a little richness to the wine. The mouth feel is also interesting, it starts out crisp and clean, then goes to full and rich.
Speyside Offline
#26 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2012, Scacciadiavoli Ross did Montefalco, Montefalco, Italy

90 points, $20.00

Nose of red plums, licorice, and herbs. Flavors of red plums, damson plums, earth, licorice, fennel, and herbs. Soft and smooth tannins. A good core of acidity. Medium in body. A nice minerality, calcium I think. A well integrated and balanced wine. Will pair great with food. 60% Sangiovese, 25% Merlot, and 15% Sagrantino. A distinctly Italian wine.
Speyside Offline
#27 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2015, Cave Spring Pinot Noir, Ontario, Canada.

93 points, $17.00

Nose of dark cherry, spice, and mineral. Medium in body, rich, velvety, and smooth. Flavors of bing cherry, blueberry, spice, wild mushrooms, and a hint of cocoa. Very well balanced with appropriate minerality and acidity. Complex from start to finish with a very nice finish. One of the best Pinot Noirs I have drank in a long time.
DrafterX Offline
#28 Posted:
Joined: 10-18-2005
Posts: 86,629
Think
Speyside Offline
#29 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
Yeah, first Canadian wine other than a dessert wine that was great. This growing region is at the west end of Lake Ontario. That moderates the temperature. It is on schist soil which allow greater heat retention. There is also limestone in the soil. This is all quite unique. Probably the only region in Canada where you can grow excellent vinifera red wines. Cave Spring also produces great Cabinet Franc, and great Riesling.
Panama Red1 Offline
#30 Posted:
Joined: 10-08-2013
Posts: 49
I have to admit to being somewhat of a wine conniseur
and a cigar enthusiast, with that being said i do prefer
a chilled White Port & Lemon Juice pared with any
cigar made with a wooden tip. Livin large BABEE!!!!
Speyside Offline
#31 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2015, Barrique Pinot Noir, Sonoma Coast, California.

91 points, $17.00

Bright cranberry in color, the nose is fragrant with fall spices, loam and dark forest fruit. The palate is bright and fresh due to the high acidity, good intensity with darker earth flavors and bright raspberry fruit. Fine tannins add structure and balance to a long finish. Well worth seeking out.
Ewok126 Offline
#32 Posted:
Joined: 06-25-2017
Posts: 3,838
Hey Allen, Could you suggest a good Port wine for me to use in my OAK barrel. I am wanting to cure the barrel in Port then follow it up with my bourbon. Trying to shoot for something like Angels Envy port-cask finished bourbon. Also where I could order what you suggest online. That way I do not have to push the wife to take me out seeing how she works 3rd 7 days a week.
Speyside Offline
#33 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
Hi Chris, Wiskey is made using ruby port casks. I would stick with a name brand. Sandemans, Dows, and Cockburn come to mind as good ruby ports with a moderate price that should be readily available. If you don't see any of those call me any we can talk about what you do see. Dows would be my first choice, I think it is called fine ruby port.
Ewok126 Offline
#34 Posted:
Joined: 06-25-2017
Posts: 3,838
Speyside wrote:
Hi Chris, Wiskey is made using ruby port casks. I would stick with a name brand. Sandemans, Dows, and Cockburn come to mind as good ruby ports with a moderate price that should be readily available. If you don't see any of those call me any we can talk about what you do see. Dows would be my first choice, I think it is called fine ruby port.



Sweet deal, Thanks for the info Allen I will start looking for Dows today. I am getting ready to empty my small barrel with my bourbon and make up a batch of TM's Peach Hot sauce. For some strange reason I think the peach hot sauce aged with a hint of Bourbon will go well together. Out of the two barrels I have, that one will be used from this point out for aging hot sauce. I was concerned about messing up one barrel due to once hot sauce is used in it that barrel is shot or no longer able to be used for Adult Alcoholic beverages, well, unless you like hot sauce flavored bourbon lmaoooo.

The wife informed me that I have a birthday coming up in 10 days (yep I forgot my own birthday), she said her and the kids was going to get me a new barrel so that would replace the one I use for hot sauce. I want to be prepared ahead of time to make the port bourbon cause I like trying to plan ahead Bwahahahaha (trying) being the key word lol. Life is Good! Herfing
Speyside Offline
#35 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2015, Judith Beck Ink, Burgunland, Austria

90 points, $15

A biodynamic beauty with a blast of dark fruits, spices and fresh, springy juiciness that leaps from the glass on the nose and hits the palate like a mouthful of summer berries. There are no oaky flavours in Ink although some time in large barrels is spent in the maturation. This biodynamic red from Judith Beck is very enjoyable. 80% Zweigelt 20% St Laurent.
Speyside Offline
#36 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2016, Iron Side reserve pinot noir, Monterey, California.

$19, points 93

Wow, wow! Big and rich, what I would expect from a $60 bottle. Beautiful nose of cassis, black currant, spice, and violet flowers.

Incredibly dense, earthy, solid acidity and minerality, black currants, blackberrys, and huckleberrys. Earthiness, limestone minerality, spice, and wild mushroom. Perhaps a touch of leather. A great, glorious wine. Seek it out, if you can find it, fantastic wine period.
Speyside Offline
#37 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2014, Spring Valley winery Uriah red blend, Walla Walla Valley, Washington.

93 points, $45.

56% Merlot, 38% Cabernet Franc, 4% Petit Verdot, 2% Malbec. A blend focused on elegance and finesse. Herbal nose with hints of cassis and cherries. Lightly spiced, with flavors of dark rich cherry, black currant, and nuance of clove. The texture is rich with velvety tannins and an ultra-long finish. Very much like a great Saint Emilion at a fraction of the cost.
Speyside Offline
#38 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
2015, Yalumba Old Bush Vine Grenache, Barossa, Australia

89 points, $17.00

Nose of dark cherries and anise. Strawberrys and vanilla on the palate with a hint of sweetness due to the fruit forwardness of the wine. Perhaps a hint of herbs and the typical Australian drinkability. Just the right amount of acidity. Great wine for pork, or perhaps Yellowfin Tuna. A very enjoyable wine for sipping on it's own. Though not complex.
jjanecka Offline
#39 Posted:
Joined: 12-08-2015
Posts: 3,813
Spey, have you tried any of the Bohemian and Souther Moravian wines? I know for a while they were getting imported by some rich yuppies from Washinton State or Oregon under the general name "Vinos Czech." Stuff from Špielberk, and a couple other wineries. Looked to me to be $5 bottles in the EU sold for $25 here. The had some good reds though.
Speyside Offline
#40 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
JJ, eastern European red wines tend to be semi sweet. Not my thing. There are very good whites. Toki is one of the great dessert wines of the world. Furmint is a very interesting and good dry white. They also make good Pinot Grigio.

I have tasted some well made reds, but would not buy one due to the residual sugar level. $5.00 a bottle would be about right.
jjanecka Offline
#41 Posted:
Joined: 12-08-2015
Posts: 3,813
I agree Eastern European wines are terrible.

These are central european wines that use common varietals. Sweet would not be the correct word to describe them; would say they're pretty balanced very smooth with a slight tartness. Their cabs taste like cabs but with a bit less astringency. I'd say they're a middle of the road type of thing. Not entirely robust but not watered down.
8trackdisco Offline
#42 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 49,963
Spey,

My wife likes German Rieslings.

Is there anything with a similar taste profile coming out of South America?
Speyside Offline
#43 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
8 Oregon Riesling have some similarity to German Rieslings. Though they do not typically have the same acidity level as Riesling from the Rhine. They are rather similar to Mosel Rieslings. A to Z makes a good one. Also the finger lakes region of New York does as well. Ravines comes to mind from that region. Suprisingly the most German like Riesling I have tasted comes from Canada along the western edge of lake Ontario. Cave Spring.

I have not tasted any Riesling from South America that I would recommend. They do some good Chardonnay and a great crisp wine called Torrontes.
Speyside Offline
#44 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
JJ, honestly I have not tasted central European wines other than Hungarian. They do good Blaufrankish which is a cross between Pinot Noir and I forget what. Another interesting grape from there is Zwigelt. This sounds like what you are talking about. The best one I have tasted is called Black Ink, and is produced by Judith Beck from Austria.
Brewha Offline
#45 Posted:
Joined: 01-25-2010
Posts: 8,505
Dear Mr. Speyside wine corner,

Seems like you got knowins of lots of wines and fancies to go with them. The wife and I have an anniversary comin up - together this time, and I would be great full if you could hep with making it a magical afternoon. Evening to.

Now that Lubey’s is closed, we are left to splurge at our local Micky-d’s. Now we buy from them the parts and make our own banquet! It’s called the McWill, and the secret recipe is to McRibs and to McNuggets. You put the nuggets on the McRibs - Chomp!

Ketchup is 5 cents a pack, and I have been savin a quarter so we can go full tilt.
Large fries go with out sayin.

I have been lookin for the perfect beverage to compliment this fine meal. But know that for an appetizer we always have us a smoke. White Owls. Pineapple for her, Double Grape for me. So the beverage selection should compliment these fine smokes along with the entre.

I had been eyein a gallon jug of “Carlo Rossi”. It’s the upgraded bottle that has a real twist off cap in stead of some piece of wood. High end. But I reckon that Rossi is a foreigner. And that won’t do. Nether will them foreign wines - like Merlot or Savigone. We need us a good American wine like Red - or Blush (thinking about the lady here).

So let me know what you think. I’m just tryin to make the little lady happy - not that she is that little anymore.

Preciate it.
frankj1 Offline
#46 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 24,961
I’m just tryin to make the little lady happy


then you better get her a McD's gift card.
Brewha Offline
#47 Posted:
Joined: 01-25-2010
Posts: 8,505
I’m way ahead of you there Frank-o. Bought her a gift certificate from the Suds N Brew that she favors. So she can have a cold one while watchin the spin dry cycle. Man - She will be beside herself!
frankj1 Offline
#48 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 24,961
Brew, you are like a genius!
Speyside Offline
#49 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,090
Brewha, I have two words for you. Boone's Farm Sangria.
frankj1 Offline
#50 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 24,961
3 words?
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