America's #1 Online Cigar Auction
first, best, biggest!

Last post 2 weeks ago by tonygraz. 77 replies replies.
2 Pages<12
Speysides wine corner
Speyside Offline
#51 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
You ruined it, I wanted to see if he was a genius.
frankj1 Offline
#52 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 24,889
like a genius...like.
frankj1 Offline
#53 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 24,889
I'm like A idiot
Speyside Offline
#54 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
We already know you are like a genius. If I had used 4 words you would have caught that too.
Brewha Offline
#55 Posted:
Joined: 01-25-2010
Posts: 8,505
Speyside wrote:
Brewha, I have two words for you. Boone's Farm Sangria.

Dear Mr. Speyside wine corner,

I ain't no expert, but ain't sangria foreign? Ifin you say it not, I'll jus explain it to the little lady. She is often worried about supporting them communists down in Mexico - but it'll be alright.

Now about the proper decantin - how much ice do you put in the wine tumble? Fill it all the way or just float a few cubes?

Don't worry - I know all about opening the bottle to breath before serving. After I crack the cap I always take a real good sniff - cause it's proper.

Preciate it.
Speyside Offline
#56 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
That depends on how much moonshine you plan on adding.
Brewha Offline
#57 Posted:
Joined: 01-25-2010
Posts: 8,505
Dear Mr. Seyside wine corner,

Shine - Brilliant, brillant, brilliant. And smart to.
For years now, the wife won’t touch the stuff cause she says that the next morning it make her lady parts sore.
Yeah, I’m winkin at you.

This is shapin up to the best anniversary ever. And I have you to thank!

Happy trails partner - I’ll let you know how it goes.

Preciate it.
8trackdisco Offline
#58 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 49,937
Speyside wrote:
8 Oregon Riesling have some similarity to German Rieslings. Though they do not typically have the same acidity level as Riesling from the Rhine. They are rather similar to Mosel Rieslings. A to Z makes a good one. Also the finger lakes region of New York does as well. Ravines comes to mind from that region. Suprisingly the most German like Riesling I have tasted comes from Canada along the western edge of lake Ontario. Cave Spring.

I have not tasted any Riesling from South America that I would recommend. They do some good Chardonnay and a great crisp wine called Torrontes.


Thanks, Spey.

Wife smiling.
Speyside Offline
#59 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
2016, Josef Leitz Rudesheimer MagdalenenKurtz Riesling Spatlese, Pfaltz, Germany.

92 points $22.00

"The Magdalenenkreuz Spätlese has a savoury nose with fruity hints of ripe apples and pear; as well as an exotic trace of grapefruit, orange and quince. The perception of taste creates in conjunction with the exceptional play of fruit and acidity a very unique exaltation and withal an intense finish. Beside these expressive scents of fruit, subtle mineral hints are joining this sappy Riesling-variation."
Reviewed by: Producer

8 this would be a great for your wife. As good of a Riesling as I have ever tasted.
Speyside Offline
#60 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
2015, Domaine Lafarge Bastide Miraflors Vieiles Vignes Cotes du Roussillon, Roussillon, France

94 points/$13.00

"This wine is almost too good to be true. A blend of 70% Syrah and 30% Grenache that was brought up in concrete tanks (Grenache) and demi-muids (Syrah), the 2015 Bastide Miraflors Vieilles Vignes reminded me of a mini Syrah from California's Manfred Krankl (yes I just compared a $14 Syrah to Sine Qua Non). It's a ripe, sexy, heady beauty that exhibits a deep, purple color as well as killer notes of smoked meats, chocolate, blackberry and black raspberries. Deep, unctuous, open knit and layered, it continues to change in the glass, has a seamless and silky profile, and not a hard edge to be found. It's a sensational value that needs to be tasted to be believed. Drink it anytime over the coming 2-4 years." -Jeb Dunnuck, Apr 2017. Wine Advocate
Speyside Offline
#61 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
2016, Novellum Chardonnay, Roussillon, France.

92 points/$9.99 per bottle

A great Chardonnay and a great value. Rich, big, aged in stainless steel and neutral oak barrels. Lovely citrus blossom nose. Nectarine and Cara Cara orange flavor. Nice finish with some length. Rather unique in that Viogner lees are added to the barrels. I think this is what imparts the mild orange flavor. Also there is a nice core of minerality. Seek this wine out, it is a winner.
itsawaldo Offline
#62 Posted:
Joined: 09-10-2006
Posts: 4,122
Dear Wineside, seems I am seeing more blends and Meritage, what's hot and what's not?
Many big brands are offering them and they appear to be a good value.
Thanks in advance.

W
Speyside Offline
#63 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
Meritage blends are great values. Simply put a heritage blend consists of only Bordeaux grapes. Historically this means Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Petite Verdot, and Malbec. In more recent history Malbec is almost never used, and Syrah is sometimes added to the blend.

Be on the lookout for Alexandra Nichole, about $20.00 and absolutly wonderful. Kendall Jackson Summation Red Vintners Reserve is also another winner for about $13.00. Finally Columbia Crest H3 Les Chevaux Red blend is another fine bottle for about$12.00.

Hope that helped a little bit.

BTW, wineside, clever.
Speyside Offline
#64 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
The Les Chevaux is technically not a Meritage, but close enough.

2013, Columbia Crest Les Chevaux, Washington, Washington

A terrific value, the 2013 H3 les Chevaux (59% Merlot, 36% Syrah, 4% Viognier and 1% Cabernet Franc) gives up lots of plums, blueberry, licorice and vanilla notes in a forward, deliciously quaffable style. It won’t make old bones, but it will drink nicely over the coming couple of years." -Jeb Dunnuck, eRobertParker.com #225, Jun 2016
Reviewed by: The Wine Advocate - 88 pts
Speyside Offline
#65 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
Now my review of the evening.

2015 Chateau Puech Haut Coteaux de Languedoc Le Prestige, Languedoc, France

93 points/$16.99 a bottle

Black cherries, blueberries, roasted herbs, and hints of leather and spice. Multidimensional with layers that peel back like an onion. Big and rich with a heavy mouth feel. Appropriate acidity with a nice core of minerality. Savory and oh so good.

If you want to try an exptional red blend this is one.
itsawaldo Offline
#66 Posted:
Joined: 09-10-2006
Posts: 4,122
Thanks I will look for them!

W
Speyside Offline
#67 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
So where do you find great value in red wines? Try wines from Laguedoc Roussillon in the south of France. They will typically consist of Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvedra with some other indigenous grapes possibly blended in. They will be big and rich, with dark berry fruit, spice and herbs, somewhat earthy, usually with some black pepper. Prices range from $10 to $20. They often receive 90 to 94 point reviews. This is one of the regions I buy a lot of wine from, and sell a lot of wine to customers from. Names to seek out Lafarge, Mas De Gourgnier, Chateau Puch Haut, Les Darons, Domaine Magellan, and Bila Haut.
SmokeMonkey Offline
#68 Posted:
Joined: 04-05-2015
Posts: 4,862
Good info, Spey. Thanks!
Speyside Offline
#69 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
Another area for great red wine values. The Douro valley in Portugal. This is where port comes from. Now many wineries are using grapes that historically were used for port to make regular red wine. Guess what. They make outstanding red wines an are rather inexpensive. They mostly run between $10 and $15. Also they often score between 90 and 92 points. The wines will be big, spicey, bold, angular, have a perfumed nose, and enjoyable dark smokey fruit.
Speyside Offline
#70 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
What white wine should taste like. I think most people think white wine is the flavor of oak barrels. They grew up with California chardonnay. What white wine really is about is acidity, fruit, and minerality. To me the best white wines are lightly oaked with French oak or no oak at all. Seek out the different. Try a white from Alsace, Burgundy, Tuscany, Umbria, Galacia, or Rioja. You just may like it.
Speyside Offline
#71 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
Red wines can be great in the summertime. You just need to choose the right ones. They need to be on the lighter side, and or have higher acidity. Try a light Pinot Noir, a Beaujolais, a Dolcetto, a Barbera, or a Gamay. You can even throw a light chill on it. Say 15 to 30 minutes in the refrigerator. They are delicious and refreshing.
Mrs. dpnewell Offline
#72 Posted:
Joined: 08-23-2014
Posts: 795
Allen,
This is a really neat thread and thankyou for starting it. I'm enjoying your expertise.

Back in the early-mid 90's I was into wine. As a member of the Wine Spectator board, I was invited to several local tastings (think "herf" for wine lovers). Most of these members had deep, deep pockets and extensive collections. I got to try some outstanding, very expensive and limited production wines. At one time I had over 200 bottles in the cellar. I loved big reds, Porto and Dessert Sherries (syrupy fortifies made from Pedro Ximenez grapes).

I found a local wine importer that had a small store in the back of their warehouse. The entire place was kept at 55 degrees. They would buy the entire production of small artisan wineries and ship them from overseas in refrigerated containers. Some of the best wines I ever tasted.

Eventually I started to get migraines from the tannins and had to give up the hobby, but it's fun to reminisce. I still have maybe a dozen or so 20 - 30 year old bottles in the basement. Every once in a while I pull a cork. Problem is, that even though they where stored cork down, the corks tend to crumble when I try to pull them. Usually end up having to filter the wine through a paper coffee filter to remove the bits of cork.


David (dpnewell)
frankj1 Offline
#73 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 24,889
cork soaker, eh?
Mrs. dpnewell Offline
#74 Posted:
Joined: 08-23-2014
Posts: 795
^Don't you have an appointment with the Atlantic Ocean?

David
Speyside Offline
#75 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
Glad you enjoy it.

Try a butlers friend corkscrew. It works great on old bottles. It is 2 staves of metal that go between the outer edge of the cork and the inner edge of the bottle. They are 180 degrees apart. Have you ever tried a Barbera? It is the least tannic red wine grape.
Speyside Offline
#76 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 7,068
Argentinian pinot noir. No one thinks of great pinot noir from Argentina, in fact they never think of pinot noir from Argentina at all. They should, Patagonia which is aproximetly as far south as Willamette is north grows some great pinot noir. They are great values. Priced from $10 to $15 you find pinot that you would expect to pay between $30 and $40. I specifically enjoy Aniello and Paradillo. Cigar box is also nice. Try one out.
tonygraz Offline
#77 Posted:
Joined: 08-11-2008
Posts: 9,880
Speyside wrote:
Glad you enjoy it.

Try a butlers friend corkscrew. It works great on old bottles. It is 2 staves of metal that go between the outer edge of the cork and the inner edge of the bottle. They are 180 degrees apart. Have you ever tried a Barbera? It is the least tannic red wine grape.


I have one of those butler corkscrews - it works surprisingly well. Had another strange corkscrew that I couldn't figure out how to use - not sure what I did with it.
Users browsing this topic
Guest
2 Pages<12