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18 Pages«<1112131415161718>
What are you reading?
Gene363 Offline
#701 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,486
Conflict: The History of the Korean War, 1950-53

By: Robert Leckie

There was much much more to the Korean war than we ever got in most history classes. The commie puppet state of North Korea attacked South Korea in an attempt to place the entire country under the boot of socialism. They very nearly successfully until the US and the UN pushed them out of South Korea and into North Korea at which point Red China sent their own soldiers into the war and nearly routed the US and UN forces again. The book details the treachery and disingenuous Rdd Chinese at the negotiation table. In the background the entire war was supported and supplied by the Stalin in USSR. The US ever aware of the threat to Europe from the USST had to moderate support for Korea in order to be able to protect Europe.

Quote:
Mr. Leckie presented the conflict in Korea with clarity and preciseness. The details switched back and forth between the situation in Korea, America's perspective, and the views of other world powers. The fight between MacArthur and Truman was represented wholly, yet it failed to deliver in terms of how it interfered with the Korean conflict.
deadeyedick Offline
#702 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 14,768
The Deficit Myth (Modern Monetary Theory) by Stephanie Kelton

Cliff notes: Deficits good, Fiscal Responsibility bad
8trackdisco Offline
#703 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,120
deadeyedick wrote:
The Deficit Myth (Modern Monetary Theory) by Stephanie Kelton

Cliff notes: Deficits good, Fiscal Responsibility bad


Found in the Fiction section I hope?
Gene363 Offline
#704 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,486
Strong Men Armed: The United States Marines Against Japan

By: Robert Leckie

Another good one by Mr. Leckie

Quote:
Strong Men Armed relates the U.S. Marines' unprecedented, relentless drive across the Pacific during World War II, from Guadalcanal to Okinawa, detailing their struggle to dislodge from heavily fortified islands an entrenched enemy who had vowed to fight to extinction—and did. (All but three of the Marines' victories required the complete annihilation of the Japanese defending force.) As scout and machine-gunner for the First Marine Division, the author fought in all its engagements till his wounding at Peleliu. Here he uses firsthand experience and impeccable research to re-create the nightmarish battles. The result is both an exciting chronicle and a moving tribute to the thousands of men who died in reeking jungles and on palm-studded beaches, thousands of miles from home and fifty years before their time, of whom Admiral Chester W. Nimitz once said, "Uncommon valor was a common virtue."Strong Men Armed includes over a dozen maps, a chronology of the war in the Pacific, the Marine Medal of Honor Winners in World War II, and Marine Corps aces in World War II.
bgz Offline
#705 Posted:
Joined: 07-29-2014
Posts: 13,023
Trying to make my way through "Principles of Quantum Mechanics" by R. Shankar... unfortunately I haven't made it very far...

But I did make it through about 200 pages of my old Calc book and about 250 or so through my linear algebra book.

Some books are just harder to read than others, maybe next time I'll go with some Dr. Seuss.
deadeyedick Offline
#706 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 14,768
8trackdisco wrote:
Found in the Fiction section I hope?


Unfortunately no. I'm thinking both parties have been using it as a textbook for some time now.
bgz Offline
#707 Posted:
Joined: 07-29-2014
Posts: 13,023
I think the theory comes from the fact that fiat currency is inflationary, therefore it means you have to keep it in play to maintain it's value (hopefully). The goal was to prevent another depression. I think it's a little soon to determine if it's going to be better in the long run, but in the short term it seems to be effective.
Gene363 Offline
#708 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,486
Lost In the Yellowstone: Truman Everts's Thirty Seven Days of Peril

By Truman Everts, Lee H. Whittlesey (Editor)

Quote:
The incredible true adventure of the only person known to have survived so long while lost in Yellowstone wilderness.

When Truman Evert visited the Yellowstone area in 1870, the Yellowstone belonged to myth. Scattered reports of a mostly unexplored wilderness filled with natural wonders caught the public’s—and Evert’s—attention. Although fifty-four, nearsighted, and an inexperienced woodsman, he joined the expedition determined to map and investigate the mysterious Yellowstone.

Separated from his party, and then abandoned by his horse, Evert embarked on one of the most grueling survival adventures recorded on the American frontier. For thirty-seven days he wandered Yellowstone alone, injured, and without food save that which he could scrape from an unfriendly land.

Truman Evert’s story manifests the qualities we associate with the great explorers: endurance, determination, inventiveness, and courage in the face of unendurable hardship. Lost in the Yellowstone is an inspiration, and a testament to one man’s will to survive.


You can read his story here: https://www.yellowstonepark.com/park/truman-everts

MACS Offline
#709 Posted:
Joined: 02-26-2004
Posts: 75,812
Zak George's dog training revolution. Watching a lot of his videos, too.

Eventually I hope to put what I have learned into practice.
Speyside Offline
#710 Posted:
Joined: 03-16-2015
Posts: 13,106
Ray Ray or Slimy Slim?
shaun341 Offline
#711 Posted:
Joined: 08-02-2012
Posts: 8,826
Range by David Epstein
deadeyedick Offline
#712 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 14,768
The New Chardonnay by Heather Cabot

How Marijuana is going mainstream and it's early investors.
CelticBomber Offline
#713 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,754
Looking for some fun light reading. Is Stephen King's Dark Tower series any good?
teedubbya Offline
#714 Posted:
Joined: 08-14-2003
Posts: 95,637
Meh. Walter the farting dog is mo bettah
DrafterX Offline
#715 Posted:
Joined: 10-18-2005
Posts: 96,286
I heard the audio book of that one was the way to go... Mellow
DrafterX Offline
#716 Posted:
Joined: 10-18-2005
Posts: 96,286
Or do you prefer the scatch & sniff pages..?? Huh
frankj1 Offline
#717 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 42,377
library finally got Full Dissidence for me, suggested by DED.
Typically takes me a month to read a book after Summer.
Ordered On Tyranny by Timothy Snyder. Have a feeling he sees the danger.
deadeyedick Offline
#718 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 14,768
Countdown 1945 by Chris Wallace

The story of the Manhattan project and events leading up to the bombing.
Gene363 Offline
#719 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,486
The Wars of America

By: Robert Leckie

Volume One: Quebec to Appomattox

Volume Two: San Juan Hill to Tonkin

With a healthy does of history contemporary to each period. I really appreciate the way Leckiee handles history. If you ever really want to know why people talk about, "commie bastards", you need to read his coverage of Korea and Viet Nam.

Quote:
This book is awesome if you like history, especially warfare. Robert Leckie had a purpose for writing The Wars of America. Throughout the book, Leckie informs as well as explains the actions of the people in charge, instead of just describing the battles themselves. In doing so, he shows his purpose, which is to inform the reader(s) of the wars of our forefathers, to provide a look at the thoughts behind the decisions made by America’s leaders, and to show American patriotism, militarism, and independence. The wars of the past gave our nation its personal stamp on the world. We say we love peace as well as exercise disciplined warfare when necessary. Leckie touches on the backbone of our nation: The struggle for independence and democracy for those who wish to have it. The book explores the different conflicts in America’s history, giving a chronological reference of the wars of that time.

The theme of this book is that America is a country bred for war. America has no qualms about fighting for what is considered right, and that is shown by this book. As Leckie shows the battles of our first wars to Vietnam, he paints a clear picture of America’s purpose: to defend the rights of its citizens, ideas, and assets, through war or peace. We know what we want, and fight to get it if we have to. If freedom is part of all Americans, then so is war. Without it, our nation would have never come to be. Leckie uses his theme to illustrate how dependent on troops we really are. We are a military-oriented country, yet we only use it for the defense of ourselves and others.

The style of The Wars of America is descriptive. The book describes the events and why/how they happened, including a back-story to show the full circle. He uses his opinions rarely, slipping in adjectives such as “brilliant” or “unwise” to show agreement or disagreement. For the most part, he just gives the facts. I think the book could also be considered an exposition. The book analyzes our battles and breaks them down into understandable pieces of information. Leckie criticizes some of the wars, giving reasons for why they failed or succeeded as well as backing other wars, showing why they happened and how America won or lost. He states something, then supports it, attacks it, or just explains it. The research is well done, not many holes appear in the explanations.

I think this book is a good read for anyone who is a history or war buff, but I do not recommend it for anyone else. It is a tough read, due to the large amount of facts and raw historical information. If you do decide to read it, the book will answer most questions about the main wars of America as well as provide descriptions about vague wars or ones most often forgotten or not covered in depth in history classes. I thought this book was awesome; I love history, maps, and wars, so this book was right up my alley. The descriptions are amazing and keep you reading. There are dry parts however, as in any historical book, and the information is provided as just facts. I would give it four stars for me but probably two for other people. I would have to say it is unique since it is the first book I have read that spans a country’s whole lifetime of wars up to its publication, shortly after the close of the Vietnam conflict.
SirKnight Offline
#720 Posted:
Joined: 12-19-2018
Posts: 605
Just about finished with “The Jungle” by Upton Sinclair. Written 115 years ago and still reads similar to current times.
Gene363 Offline
#721 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,486
George Washington's War: The Saga of the American Revolution

By Robert Leckie

I would never have thought a history book, let alone one about the Revolutionary War would ever induce me to say, "I could hardly put this one down" but it is true. It cover the Revolutionary war for independence from England. Leckie doesn't just cover the battles, he inserts biographies for key characters as they are introduced in the book.

For those that have no respect for the Founding Fathers and especially the Revoloutionary era soldiers, fought with minimal resources, weapons, food, clothing and even shoes. In two cases the book mentions following the marching soldiers by tracking their bloody tracks in the snow.

I learned that John Laurens gained French assurances that French ships would support American operations that year; the promised naval support was later to prove invaluable at the Siege of Yorktown. In a meeting with he French King Laurens sid without aid for the Revolution, the Americans might be forced by the British to fight against France. When Laurens and Paine returned to America in August 1781, they brought 2.5 million livres in silver, the first part of a French gift of 6 million and a loan of 10 million.

France did support our fight for independence, however when the colonists failed to win several decisive battles France began to work on a European peace conference that would have ended the War and maintained British control of the colonies. Nathaniel Greens battles with Cornwallis to take back North and South Carolina sent Cornwallis to his eventual defeat at Yorktown stopped that idea.
deadeyedick Offline
#722 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 14,768
The Future Earth by Eric Holthaus

Capitalism will have to be abandoned and all fossil fuels will be outlawed. We will need to do Geoengineering of the earth's atmosphere even if we start now with the Green New Deal. Portions of Miami, Charlston, Norfolk, Philadelphia, New Your and Boston will be underwater. The US and other developed countries will need to pay trillions in reparations to the undeveloped countries of the earth and take in hundreds of millions of displaced migrants....... etc.
8trackdisco Offline
#723 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,120
1312: Among the Ultras: A Journey With the World’s Most Extreme Fans

You can see them, but you don't know them. Ultras are football fans like no others. A hugely visible and controversial part of the global game, their credo and aesthetic replicated in almost every league everywhere on earth, a global movement of extreme fandom and politics is also one of the largest youth movements in the world.
Gene363 Offline
#724 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,486
The Extraordinary Life of Josef Ganz – The Jewish Engineer Behind Hitler’s Volkswagen

By: Paul Schilperoord

The engineer behind the Volkswagen car, not Porche who was assigned to put it into production by Hitler's minions as they could not have a Jewish engineer be the Father of the VW.

Quote:
The astonishing biography of Josef Ganz, a Jewish designer from Frankfurt, who in May 1931 created a revolutionary small car: the Maiká¤fer (German for "May bug"). Seven years later, Hitler introduced the Volkswagen. The Nazis not only "took" the concept of Ganz's family car–their production model even ended up bearing the same nickname. The Beetle incorporated many of the features of Ganz's original Maiká¤fer, yet until recently Ganz received no recognition for his pioneering work. The Nazis did all they could to keep the Jewish godfather of the German compact car out of the history books. Now Paul Schilperoord sets the record straight.

Josef Ganz was hunted by the Nazis, even beyond Germany's borders, and narrowly escaped assassination. He was imprisoned by the Gestapo until an influential friend with connections to Gáöring helped secure his release. Soon afterward, he was forced to flee Germany, while Porsche, using many of his groundbreaking ideas, created the Volkswagen for Hitler. After the war, Ganz moved to Australia, where he died in 1967.


More information on Gantz: https://josefganz.org/biography/
Gene363 Offline
#725 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,486
Guests of the Emperor: The Secret History of Japan's Mukden POW Camp

By: Linda Goetz Holmes

This book tells the story of the POWs of Mukden, Manchuria and how the Japanease used the POWs as guina pigs for biological weapons from their infamous Unit 731.

Quote:
In World War II, over 36,000 American men, mostly military but some civilian, were thrown into Japanese POW camps and forced to labor for companies working for Japan s war effort. At Japan s largest fixed military prison camp, Mitsubishi s huge factory complex at Mukden, Manchuria, more than 2,000 American prisoners where subjected to cold, starvation, beatings, and even medical experiments, while manufacturing parts for Zero fighter planes. Those lucky enough to survive required the efforts of an OSS rescue team and a special recovery unit to make it home alive.

Holmes, who spent two decades tracking down the POWs, shows conclusively for the first time that some Americans at Mukden were singled out for experiments by Japan s infamous biological warfare team.
MACS Offline
#726 Posted:
Joined: 02-26-2004
Posts: 75,812
MACS wrote:
Zak George's dog training revolution. Watching a lot of his videos, too.

Eventually I hope to put what I have learned into practice.


Now halfway through Brandon McMillan's "Lucky Dog Lessons". Still don't know what I'm doing, but it ain't for lack of trying.
frankj1 Offline
#727 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 42,377
MACS wrote:
Now halfway through Brandon McMillan's "Lucky Dog Lessons". Still don't know what I'm doing, but it ain't for lack of trying.

are you eating more treats than usual?
MACS Offline
#728 Posted:
Joined: 02-26-2004
Posts: 75,812
frankj1 wrote:
are you eating more treats than usual?


Well, I uh, that is to say... it's the holidays and stuff, so maybe. Anxious
deadeyedick Offline
#729 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 14,768
frankj1 wrote:
are you eating more treats than usual?


Let's just say it would not be wise to get between MACS and a fire hydrant.
bgz Offline
#730 Posted:
Joined: 07-29-2014
Posts: 13,023
Probably wouldn't be so bad if you painted your azz red.
izonfire Offline
#731 Posted:
Joined: 12-09-2013
Posts: 8,435
MACS wrote:
Now halfway through Brandon McMillan's "Lucky Dog Lessons". Still don't know what I'm doing, but it ain't for lack of trying.

Damn MACS, you’re really putting a lot of effort into this.
You should give yourself a treat for being such a good boy...
deadeyedick Offline
#732 Posted:
Joined: 03-13-2003
Posts: 14,768
MACS wrote:
Now halfway through Brandon McMillan's "Lucky Dog Lessons". Still don't know what I'm doing, but it ain't for lack of trying.


Well, at least you taught him to read and watch the videos.
rfenst Offline
#733 Posted:
Joined: 06-23-2007
Posts: 36,945
Washington Post, right now. NYT later and tomorrow
8trackdisco Offline
#734 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,120
The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuq.

Saw DED read it. Kind of fun.
Smooth light Offline
#735 Posted:
Joined: 06-26-2020
Posts: 3,598
THE WEAPONLESS WARRIOR -
By Richard Kim...1974 release
MACS Offline
#736 Posted:
Joined: 02-26-2004
Posts: 75,812
Liberty and Tyranny - Mark Levin
Gene363 Offline
#737 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,486
Smooth light wrote:
THE WEAPONLESS WARRIOR -
By Richard Kim...1974 release


Wow, Okinawan Karate! I worked with Jim Logue, may he rest in peace, a heck of a nice man and a crackerjack at MS Access programing. I went to his viewing, a room full of more than 400 of some the most badass men, all crying at his passing.

"Jim Logue of the Ryu Te style of Okinawa Karate. Logue Sensei is the senior student of Taika Seiyu Oyata and has achieved the rank of 9th Dan in Ryu Te and Oyata’s family art known as Oyata Shin Shu Ho."

https://www.ikigaiway.com/interview-jim-logue-9th-dan-ryu-te-and-oyata-shin-shu-ho/

bgz Offline
#738 Posted:
Joined: 07-29-2014
Posts: 13,023
Something Deeply Hidden by Sean Carroll.

Got about a third to go. Easy read for me as I follow his lectures and podcasts anyway. Probably not a particular easy read for most, but it's worth checking and putting the time in to understand it.
CarsonTheCat Offline
#739 Posted:
Joined: 05-16-2020
Posts: 522
"Adult Children of Emotionally Immature Parents: How to Heal from Distant, Rejecting, or Self-Involved Parents" (2015) by Lindsay C. Gibson.

Not exactly a fun read, but something both my wife and I wanted to read, since we grew up in similar situations. Already a couple chapters in, and I'm seeing many familiar situations that resonate deep with both of us.

Sunoverbeach Offline
#740 Posted:
Joined: 08-11-2017
Posts: 12,452
Gene363 wrote:
Wow, Okinawan Karate! I worked with Jim Logue, may he rest in peace, a heck of a nice man and a crackerjack at MS Access programing. I went to his viewing, a room full of more than 400 of some the most badass men, all crying at his passing.

"Jim Logue of the Ryu Te style of Okinawa Karate. Logue Sensei is the senior student of Taika Seiyu Oyata and has achieved the rank of 9th Dan in Ryu Te and Oyata’s family art known as Oyata Shin Shu Ho."

https://www.ikigaiway.com/interview-jim-logue-9th-dan-ryu-te-and-oyata-shin-shu-ho/

Impressive, absolutely. But did he ever meet Mr. Miyagi?
Gene363 Offline
#741 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,486
Sunoverbeach wrote:
Impressive, absolutely. But did he ever meet Mr. Miyagi?


Good question, I can say he'd have a good dry humor comeback. Herfing
Gene363 Offline
#742 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,486
From Sea to Shining Sea: From the War of 1812 to the Mexican War; The Saga of America's Expansion

By Robert Leckie

Another excellent book from Mr. Leckie, hard to put down. Learn why US Army soldiers are called Doughboys and the origin a line of the Marine Core anthem, the Halls of Montezuma.

Quote:
In historian Robert Leckie's capable hands, everything about war comes alive, from the noble to the vile. He's written more than two dozen books about America's military past, not counting various fictional and autobiographical musings on war. "From Sea to Shining Sea" is vintage Leckie: vivid narrative style, bloody battles, glossy snapshots of key figures, catchy anecdotes, sweeping (sometimes infuriating) generalizations, and caustic asides. He marches smartly from the War of 1812 -- after glancing over his shoulder at the young republic's successful skirmishes with the pesky Barbary Pirates -- to the land-grabbing Mexican War in the 1840s.

The War of 1812, in which Americans battled the British, %J Canadians and aggrieved American Indians, excites Mr. Leckie's imagination and demands most of his attention. Like most historians, he points to "national honor" as the deciding cause. But then he fogs the issue by simply asserting that President James Madison's decision for war was based on a desire to thwart James Monroe's presidential aspirations.

Mr. Leckie has a surer hand describing military matters. He moves briskly through the fall of Detroit and the defeat at Niagara; the hard-fought naval operations on Lake Champlain and Lake Erie (where Oliver Hazard Perry immortalized his victory with "We have met the enemy and they are ours"); and Andrew Jackson's rousing victories at Horseshoe Bend and New Orleans. The latter was fought before the news arrived that the war had ended.

Along the way, Mr. Leckie expertly profiles the War Hawks -- Henry Clay and John C. Calhoun -- and aged, slow-footed generals such as William "Granny" Hull. The legendary Davy Crockett, decked out in fringed leather jacket and coonskin hat (the frontiersman who "made bumpkinism in America a badge of honor") gets his due; so does Commodore Joshua Barney of Baltimore. Mr. Leckie pays homage to the mighty Tecumseh, the brilliant Shawnee warrior whose death in battle was a blow to Indian dreams of freedom.

America's low point came when the British, sailing up the Chesapeake Bay on route to attack Baltimore, detoured and burned the capital in 1814. When the rowdy victors departed, patriots attempted to cover the nation's shame by throwing a coat of white paint on the president's blackened house -- henceforth to be called the White House. Mr. Leckie writes: "Never before had Americans been so humiliated as by the news of the debacle at Washington. Not even the disaster at Pearl Harbor 130 years later could rival the shock."

During the subsequent bombardment of Baltimore's Fort McHenry and Barney's fleet, the local poet Francis Scott Key watched with swelling pride as the dawn's early light revealed that the fort had held, that the flag was still there. His scribbled lines, first printed in the Baltimore Patriot, were put to an old drinking song; more than 100 years later it became the national anthem.

Mr. Leckie's buoyant, muscular prose works well for military history; his book has the sort of snap history buffs love. But he is aware of the era's savagery.

The brutal, land-grabbing policies of Jackson and Gen. William Henry Harrison (of "Tippecanoe and Tyler, Too" fame) reflect the age's view of American Indians all too well. The Seminole War (1835-1842) in Florida, Mr. Leckie writes, "was one more shameful episode in the long sorry saga of the deliberate extinction and dispossession of the southern Indians by the U.S. Government."

It was a rough time. Westward expansion sounds good in the textbooks, particularly when called "Manifest Destiny." But, as Mr. Leckie shows, too many of the Americans who streamed into Texas and other territories claimed by Mexico were heartless adventurers, roughnecks and hooligans.

A goodly number were debtors or ne'er-do-wells who departed quietly, their goodbyes nothing more than "GTT" -- Gone to Texas -- chalked on their cabin door. GTT was "read like obituaries by sobbing wives, white-faced bankers closing on unpaid loans, bilked bondsmen, and infuriated lawyers."

The volunteers entering Texas once war with Mexico broke out in 1846 contained a full measure of rotten apples. They deserted at will, saluted when they felt like it, fought members of the regular army, and brutalized the local population.

Gens. Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott struggled mightily to discipline these raw recruits. On one occasion, the normally gentle Scott had 50 deserters publicly hanged.

When their comrades' 12-month terms were completed, the brass sighed in relief. But before they left "they pillaged, raped and murdered in a paroxysm of barbarity rivaling the merciless riders of Ghengis Khan or the cruel and bloody Nazi death squads and SS troops in World War II."

Although Mr. Leckie liberally uses such overblown statements, for the most part he writes sensibly, with a refreshing willingness to tell the story fairly and fully. He writes expansively and movingly about Mexico's political and military leader, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna. Gen. Santa Anna and his men fought bravely, Mr. Leckie writes, but a series of crushing defeats, concluding with the fall of Mexico City, brought victory to America.

America got what it wanted from the short little war with Mexico -- it ended Sept. 17, 1847, not quite a year and a half after it started. For a mere $15 million, the United States acquired California, New Mexico and all of Texas north of the Rio Grande. During the dazzling conquest of Mexico City, Ulysses S. Grant, George B. McClellan, Robert E. Lee and Thomas (later nicknamed "Stonewall") Jackson covered themselves with glory.

In the not too distant future, they would square off against each other in the Civil War. Then Grant and Lee, and scores of other young officers who earned their spurs in the Mexican War, would learn in full measure that "war is hell."

Mr. Clayton is the Harry A. Logan Sr. Professor of American History at Allegheny College in Meadville, Pa.
8trackdisco Offline
#743 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,120
Just finished Post Office by Charles Bukowski.

Raw, direct and often crude. He did know how to tell a story.
MACS Offline
#744 Posted:
Joined: 02-26-2004
Posts: 75,812
Cesar's Way - Cesar Millan

This is dog training book #3. So far I liked Brandon Mcmillan's book better than Zak George's. Just started this one, but will be applying one technique today. No food until after exercise. All 3 books say that training goes much better with a hungry dog, but Cesar says he doesn't feed his dogs until after they've had their exercise.
CelticBomber Offline
#745 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,754
What I can remember of the last few months...

Spooky Action at a Distance - George Musser
Animal Farm - George Orwell
1984 - George Orwell
Warlords of Ancient Mexico - Peter G. Tsouras
Black Holes, Tides, and Curved Space - Benjamin Schumacher
Treason - Orson Scott Card
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Mark Twain
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court - Mark Twain (One of my all time fav reads)
The Parasitic Mind - Gad Saad
The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs - Steve Brusatte
Heroes - Stephen Fry
Mythos - Stephen Fry
Secret Societies - John Lawrence Reynolds
Defying Hitler - Sebastian Haffner
David and Goliath - Malcolm Gladwell

Half are rereads... I think Don Quixote is next.
8trackdisco Offline
#746 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,120
MACS wrote:
Cesar's Way - Cesar Millan No food until after exercise.


That was my dad's philosophy. You don't work, you don't eat.

The country's obesity, diabetes and hypertension numbers would be much improved.
MACS Offline
#747 Posted:
Joined: 02-26-2004
Posts: 75,812
^I'll drink to that...
izonfire Offline
#748 Posted:
Joined: 12-09-2013
Posts: 8,435
Could one of you guys grab me a drink too?
I don’t wanna hafta get up...
8trackdisco Offline
#749 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,120
Just finished Supermanic by Bob Seize.

Supermanic is a revealing peek behind the cracked curtains of a life lived with Bipolar I disorder. Struck by unpredictable delusions of grandeur, Rob—a nineteen-year-old aspiring musician—finds that his uncontrollable Christ complex lands him in the psych ward several times during his second coming-of-age. Believing he’s the one true catalyst for a biblical end of the world.

Ever had a book you were curious to learn more about and then get rattled by the content? Found myself reading parts of it aloud to my wife. As if I needed to read the words out loud to believe what I was taking in.

What made it so interesting to me is I know the guy who wrote it. His stark honesty and frankness in the book are so different from the guy I know or have known for a couple years.

Knew the crib notes version of BiPolar Disorder. The book was a disturbing as he was. Anxiety and depression have nothing on this.

The guy is a cigar smoker on top of it all. Plan on sitting down with him and asking... oh... 150 questions.

If you want to learn about the illness and or put a couple bucks in the pocket of a botl who is making his way, do consider purchasing.

rugrunner Offline
#750 Posted:
Joined: 02-15-2004
Posts: 10,087
If I ran the zoo by dr. Suess...
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