America's #1 Online Cigar Auction
first, best, biggest!

Last post 5 weeks ago by CelticBomber. 80 replies replies.
2 Pages<12
Top general was so fearful Trump might spark war that he made secret calls to his Chinese counterpar
DrMaddVibe Offline
#51 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 50,917
Dg west deptford wrote:
Imagine if the generals didn't abandon Bagram or Kabul or 80 BILLION in my tax dollars when Houseplant ordered it.

It would've been understandable & appreciated by those that'd still be alive to say the least but...

I'd condemn it just like Milley.
There's something really off with this woke looser.

Serious people are laughing at us seeing we'll soon destroy US from within


The Left lacks testicles and the ability to use them. Soft effeminate coddled mommas boys with zero courage or conviction.

The DNC is a terrorist organization.

bgz Offline
#52 Posted:
Joined: 07-29-2014
Posts: 10,988
HockeyDad wrote:
If he did what is alleged he was not defending the constitution.


I disagree. Big orange in chief was constantly openly and blatantly looking for loopholes to get around that whole constitution thing.

In my opinion he would have killed protesters if he thought he could get away with it.

That stup*d f*ckin document got in the way of everything he wanted to do (I could imagine him saying something like that... I don't think it's that far fetched).

You don't think they saw it... the people that worked with him every day. They saw it.

Why do you think so many resigned? His dishonor to the office is legendary. His blatant disregard for the constitution is notorious.

People are getting rich off books they wrote telling of his sh*tty-ness... how sh*tty of a human he is... how sh*tty of a president he was. He was the sh*ttiest.

Keep praising that sh*t bag. You're on the wrong side of history on this one.

Treason... maybe?

But if everyone knows Trump himself is a sh*tbag who has no respect for the constitution...

And if everyone knows how unstable he was and what spurred the action...

why would they?

He's a f*ckin historical sh*t bag at this point... as in... he's in the past... let that orange mother f*cker stay in the past.
Burner02 Offline
#53 Posted:
Joined: 12-21-2010
Posts: 11,862
fiddler898 wrote:
No, THAT'S why you have grown-ups in the room.


I doubt very seriously that you would recognize an adult in the room if they were sitting next to you.

Gen Milley is a POS and time for him to go. This is/was my position even prior to the latest alleged revelations about the China calls (oops, can I say China?). He has been inside the beltway, way to long and is more political than military. Any thoughts of "Duty, Honor, Country" for him have long since been erased.

In the militery a chain of command exist and it even applies to Milley. Don't let the door hit you in the ass.
DrMaddVibe Offline
#54 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 50,917
Where is Joint Chief of Staff Rat **** at now?

Did he alert China? France? Australia? His dressmaker?

For those of you that voted for Biden? THIS IS WHAT YOU VOTED FOR!

France Accuses "Backstabbing" Biden Of Being 'Worse Than Trump' As UK-Aussie Defense Pact Sinks Sub Deal

As it turns out, while President Biden was celebrating yesterday's "historic" security pact between the US, UK and Australia to establish a "partnership" that will help furnish Canberra with US nuclear submarine technology, one American ally was sulking in defeat.

Back in 2016, Australia had signed $40 billion contract with France's Naval Group to build a new submarine fleet to replace the Aussie's aging fleet of Collins subs. But apparently, the new deal with the US and UK makes this deal unnecessary (since Australia will now be getting its subs from the US, not France), essentially stealing a major $40 billion deal out of the mouth of the French defense industry.

Understandably, France wasn't pleased. And in his first comments on the deal, French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian told franceinfo radio that President Biden had just pulled a "Trump-like" double-cross against a major American ally - all while claiming to be "rebuilding" America's ties with its European allies, which (according to Biden and the Democrats) had been hopelessly damaged by President Trump's demand that Europe simply pay its fair share for its defense.

"This brutal, unilateral and unpredictable decision reminds me a lot of what Mr Trump used to do," Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian told franceinfo radio. "I am angry and bitter. This isn't done between allies."

"It's a stab in the back. We created a relationship of trust with Australia and that trust has been broken," Le Drian said.

Just two weeks ago, the Australian defense and foreign ministers had reconfirmed the sub deal with France, and French President Emmanuel Macron even went so far as to publicly celebrate decades of future cooperation when hosting Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison in June. Now, especially in the eyes of his own defense industry, he is being left with egg on his face.

President Trump had a famously hot-cold relationship with French President Emmanuel Maron. But after this, diplomats who opted to remain anonymous are telling Reuters that the latest deal could further damage the US relationship with France, potentially leaving it at its most frosty point since the "freedom fries" backlash during the beginning of the war in Iraq.

Already, the French are playing damage control with French Defense Minister Florence Parly holding a news conference thursday to say that "we will make sure ti limit the consequences" of Australia's contract breach. "We will defend our interests," he added.

Unfortunately for France, the embarrassment doesn't stop at the submarines. France is preparing to take the EU's rotating presidency, and as such has been playing a major role in negotiating a security pact with the Aussies. Now, it's not even clear if that will be neccessary.

Meanwhile, confronted with France's displeasure, President Biden has awkwardly pledged to continue working "closely" with France as a "key partner" in the Indo-Pacific.

We can almost hear the transatlantic ties straining.

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/france-accuses-biden-being-worse-trump-uk-aussie-defense-pact-sinks-sub-deal
bgz Offline
#55 Posted:
Joined: 07-29-2014
Posts: 10,988
So their complaint is it's a Trump-like business stabbing in the back...

You f*ckers just blow my mind.
DrafterX Offline
#56 Posted:
Joined: 10-18-2005
Posts: 95,438
I heard the french make love with their faces.... Mellow
HockeyDad Offline
#57 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 41,618
bgz wrote:
I disagree. Big orange in chief was constantly openly and blatantly looking for loopholes to get around that whole constitution thing.

In my opinion he would have killed protesters if he thought he could get away with it.

That stup*d f*ckin document got in the way of everything he wanted to do (I could imagine him saying something like that... I don't think it's that far fetched).

You don't think they saw it... the people that worked with him every day. They saw it.

Why do you think so many resigned? His dishonor to the office is legendary. His blatant disregard for the constitution is notorious.

People are getting rich off books they wrote telling of his sh*tty-ness... how sh*tty of a human he is... how sh*tty of a president he was. He was the sh*ttiest.

Keep praising that sh*t bag. You're on the wrong side of history on this one.

Treason... maybe?

But if everyone knows Trump himself is a sh*tbag who has no respect for the constitution...

And if everyone knows how unstable he was and what spurred the action...

why would they?

He's a f*ckin historical sh*t bag at this point... as in... he's in the past... let that orange mother f*cker stay in the past.



It does not matter if you don’t like Trump. He did make mean tweets and was orange. It doesn’t matter that you think he’s a ****bag.

If Milley did what he is accused of in that book this is a court-martial offense.
DrafterX Offline
#58 Posted:
Joined: 10-18-2005
Posts: 95,438
Lock him Up..!! Mad
CelticBomber Offline
#59 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,412
DrMaddVibe wrote:
Meanwhile, confronted with France's displeasure, President Biden has awkwardly pledged to continue working "closely" with France as a "key partner" in the Indo-Pacific.

We can almost hear the transatlantic ties straining.

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/france-accuses-biden-being-worse-trump-uk-aussie-defense-pact-sinks-sub-deal[/b][/i]



You are out of your mind and have no idea what you are talking about. You find articles that you agree with and just post them as proof that you're right. You are not right.

I've been following the Australian submarine debacle for years. They're a key ally against China. Especially now that China is trying to claim the whole South China Sea. Back in the late 70's early 80's Australia began planning for a new sub fleet. They had 6 British built Oberon class subs built between the 1950's through the late 70's. They were outdated and needed to be replaced. The Australians decided to go with a Swedish designed diesel/electric sub. What they got was the Collins class. It was a disaster. The first sub was completed in 1994 but wasn't commissioned for service until 2000. They built 6 and all 6 had so many problems the Australians were lucky if they could keep one sub out on patrol at any one time over a 20 year period. It was a huge scandal. Billions wasted. The Australian Navy wanted nuclear powered subs. But, in Australia the perception of anything nuclear is anathema. They supply the world with 30% of it's uranium and have zero nuclear powered anything.

They want to replace the Collins class. The Australian Navy wants to go nuclear. The Australian government say's no. So, they pick the French short fin barracuda. A nuclear sub design they are going to refit as a diesel/electric sub. Guess how that's been going. Since 2016 they've spent about 2 billion trying to redesign the french sub. In 2016 getting a nuclear powered sub from the U.S. was not even a choice.

Now here's the important bit. The U.S. has only ever shared it's nuke sub tech with Britain. But, with the new U.S., Britain and Australian security deal to counter China we've made our nuclear powered subs available to Australia. With China's Navy roaming free through Australia's territorial waters the Aussie Navy finally had the juice to force nuclear subs right on through the Aussie govt. and they're getting them from us. That means more jobs for 1000's of people in the U.S. for years to come. A better prepared ally in the contested region that we'll be able to work with a lot easier since we're going to be using the same tech and you're upset because the French got their feelings hurt? That makes Biden bad?

Were you recently bit by a frothy squirrel or raccoon? All this outrage can't be good for you. You sound exactly like the morons on TV who were crying when Trump won.


DrMaddVibe Offline
#60 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 50,917
CelticBomber wrote:
You are out of your mind and have no idea what you are talking about. You find articles that you agree with and just post them as proof that you're right. You are not right.



Hey Joy Behar...what happened to you sticking to Spain and collecting a check for selling Tampax?

Couldn't even do that, eh shovelhead?
CelticBomber Offline
#61 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,412
DrMaddVibe wrote:
Hey Joy Behar...what happened to you sticking to Spain and collecting a check for selling Tampax?

Couldn't even do that, eh shovelhead?


Heh! The Tampax thing really got to you. I called you a crazy chick first so neener, neener, neener. The Spain thing was a Jaws reference you missed. You're gonna need a bigger shovel... get it?

Have you realized yet that you've been in an argument with me in this thread where I never agreed nor disagreed with you and never commented on anything you said? Until you lost the little mind you have left that is.

Any comment on the Aussie, French, U.S. submarine situation that has you so angry? Didn't think so.
bgz Offline
#62 Posted:
Joined: 07-29-2014
Posts: 10,988
HockeyDad wrote:
It does not matter if you don’t like Trump. He did make mean tweets and was orange. It doesn’t matter that you think he’s a ****bag.

If Milley did what he is accused of in that book this is a court-martial offense.


I didn't disagree... I'm just saying don't be surprised if it don't happen.

Well, I didn't disagree that he could get tried for it.

I disagreed with some of your other sh*t though.
HockeyDad Offline
#63 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 41,618
bgz wrote:
I didn't disagree... I'm just saying don't be surprised if it don't happen.

Well, I didn't disagree that he could get tried for it.

I disagreed with some of your other sh*t though.



I was prolly just making that other **** up.
DrMaddVibe Offline
#64 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 50,917
CelticBomber wrote:
Heh! The Tampax thing really got to you. I called you a crazy chick first so neener, neener, neener. The Spain thing was a Jaws reference you missed. You're gonna need a bigger shovel... get it?

Have you realized yet that you've been in an argument with me in this thread where I never agreed nor disagreed with you and never commented on anything you said? Until you lost the little mind you have left that is.

Any comment on the Aussie, French, U.S. submarine situation that has you so angry? Didn't think so.


Don't break your own arm backslapping yourself.

The last article I posted is how unhinged the current administration is. Your woke general was scared of Trump and his current boss can't even remember the name of the Australian PM...so your point is what?

yeah.
CelticBomber Offline
#65 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,412
DrMaddVibe wrote:
Don't break your own arm backslapping yourself.

The last article I posted is how unhinged the current administration is. Your woke general was scared of Trump and his current boss can't even remember the name of the Australian PM...so your point is what?

yeah.



Sigh. How is he my woke general?

Your last article was about the US getting a 40 Billion dollar contract to build subs. How is that unhinged?

I know... horse but, it's like a sore tooth. I can't help poking it.
DrMaddVibe Offline
#66 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 50,917
You defended your woke general.

It's not my fault you cannot connect the dots on the articles I share here. Gen Woke wants to warn China and has stated as much...

https://twitter.com/HuXijin_GT/status/1438495756093067264?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1438495756093067264%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_c10&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.zerohedge.com%2Fgeopolitical%2Fbeijing-fumes-over-new-us-uk-aussie-arms-pact-australia-becoming-enemy-china-anti


Pedo Joe fancies himself a trade broker and stuck his nose into a wasp nest with our allies that will most assuredly use these submarines for their own protection against the advancing CCP navy.

Really surprised you couldn't put that together. Maybe stick to your ads at least you get paid. I hope so.
CelticBomber Offline
#67 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,412
DrMaddVibe wrote:
You defended your woke general.

It's not my fault you cannot connect the dots on the articles I share here. Gen Woke wants to warn China and has stated as much...

https://twitter.com/HuXijin_GT/status/1438495756093067264?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw%7Ctwcamp%5Etweetembed%7Ctwterm%5E1438495756093067264%7Ctwgr%5E%7Ctwcon%5Es1_c10&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.zerohedge.com%2Fgeopolitical%2Fbeijing-fumes-over-new-us-uk-aussie-arms-pact-australia-becoming-enemy-china-anti


Pedo Joe fancies himself a trade broker and stuck his nose into a wasp nest with our allies that will most assuredly use these submarines for their own protection against the advancing CCP navy.

Really surprised you couldn't put that together. Maybe stick to your ads at least you get paid. I hope so.


Okay this is getting boring. Brick wall

All I said was back channel communications are normal and expected. I never defended how this guy used his back channel. If you can't make that distinction you can't be helped.

We're selling our allies the means to protect themselves against China and that's a wasps nest? How? Why do you care so much about France's or China's feelings now? Trump certainly didn't and you didn't seem to care then. We routinely compete with France and other allies for military contracts. You're upset that France lost a 40 billion dollar military contract to us. That makes sense how?

Beijing is upset at us and Australia for the deal. So what? We routinely sail into the South China Sea that China claims for itself all on our own just to make it clear that we don't play by their rules. Trump upset Beijing for over a year threatening China with trade embargo's and tariffs. He routinely referred to the Corona virus as the Wuhan virus and now you're worried about what China thinks about us? Ever heard of Darwin port? It's an Australian port that signed a 99 year lease with a Chinese company 3 years ago. Australia is in the process of breaking that lease due to national security concerns. You think that made Beijing happy? Where exactly do your sympathies lie? With France or China?

I believe your cheese has slipped off it's cracker.
bgz Offline
#68 Posted:
Joined: 07-29-2014
Posts: 10,988
CelticBomber wrote:
Okay this is getting boring. Brick wall

All I said was back channel communications are normal and expected. I never defended how this guy used his back channel. If you can't make that distinction you can't be helped.

We're selling our allies the means to protect themselves against China and that's a wasps nest? How? Why do you care so much about France's or China's feelings now? Trump certainly didn't and you didn't seem to care then. We routinely compete with France and other allies for military contracts. You're upset that France lost a 40 billion dollar military contract to us. That makes sense how?

Beijing is upset at us and Australia for the deal. So what? We routinely sail into the South China Sea that China claims for itself all on our own just to make it clear that we don't play by their rules. Trump upset Beijing for over a year threatening China with trade embargo's and tariffs. He routinely referred to the Corona virus as the Wuhan virus and now you're worried about what China thinks about us? Ever heard of Darwin port? It's an Australian port that signed a 99 year lease with a Chinese company 3 years ago. Australia is in the process of breaking that lease due to national security concerns. You think that made Beijing happy? Where exactly do your sympathies lie? With France or China?

I believe your cheese has slipped off it's cracker.


Do not try and bend the spoon, that’s impossible. Instead, only try to realize the truth… there is no spoon.
DrafterX Offline
#69 Posted:
Joined: 10-18-2005
Posts: 95,438
So, Ben is denying Seltic a spoon session.. poor Seltic.. Sad
rfenst Offline
#70 Posted:
Joined: 06-23-2007
Posts: 35,007
A Smart Submarine Deal With the Aussies
The new partnership serves U.S. interests, despite French howls.

WSJ Editorial Board

President Biden’s deal to deepen the U.S. strategic partnership with Australia and the U.K. as a counterweight to China is being denounced as Trumpian by critics in France. The AUKUS partnership, announced Wednesday, will begin with the joint development of Australian nuclear-powered submarines, as opposed to the diesel-powered subs Paris planned to build for Canberra.

The French intend their Trump references as a slur against Mr. Biden for unpredictability, and the spat with an important European ally is unfortunate. France will lose much of a $39 billion weapons deal, and the French embassy in Washington went so far as to cancel a dinner Friday celebrating the 240th anniversary of French naval assistance in the Revolutionary War. There’s no pique like French pique.

Yet the rise of AUKUS is worth the temporary tension as the U.S. tries to maintain a favorable military balance in the Asia-Pacific. Australia isn’t part of NATO, but the U.S. ally has come under coercive pressure from China. Beijing imposed tariffs on Australian food and raw materials after Prime Minister Scott Morrison called for a probe into the origins of the coronavirus. China has detained Australian citizens and demanded that its elected officials and free press stop criticizing China’s political system.

Credit to Mr. Morrison for not yielding to China’s trade intimidation. One lesson for Beijing is that such tactics in the Asia-Pacific advertise to other countries the treatment in store for them as China’s economic and military reach extends across the globe. Beijing’s strategy is to divide and conquer, and the AUKUS initiative shows Western solidarity.

Focusing on submarines as the first initiative also sends the right message. China’s recent naval buildup has been extraordinary, and Beijing’s stated ambition is to control Taiwan and dominate disputed waters in the Western Pacific.

The eight or more nuclear-powered submarines the U.S. and U.K. will help Australia build are difficult for a hostile navy to detect as they travel long distances for reconnaissance or sea denial. They can remain submerged at high speeds for longer periods than diesel-powered boats, which need to surface periodically to burn fuel. The technology-sharing creates some risk, but the benefits of broadening the defense-industrial base across close allies are significant.

The murmurs that this partnership undermines Five Eyes, the group of English-speaking nations that also includes New Zealand and Canada, don’t wash. Five Eyes is about intelligence sharing, which will continue. Canada doesn’t want nuclear submarines. New Zealand, which has taken a softer line on China than other Five Eyes nations, says it won’t let the Australian subs into its territorial waters.

The U.S. shouldn’t dismiss France’s anger at losing out on a major defense sale. But Australia judged that this is a better deal, and French President Emmanuel Macron has made a point of emphasizing “strategic autonomy” from the U.S., including on China, Russia and Iran.

The message to Europe from AUKUS is that the U.S. is serious about resisting Chinese hegemony in the Asia-Pacific. Europe can’t play China’s game of divide-and-conquer on economic and strategic issues without consequences for its U.S. relationship.
rfenst Offline
#71 Posted:
Joined: 06-23-2007
Posts: 35,007
How to Deter China From Invading Taiwan
To change Beijing’s calculus, arm Taipei with missiles and turn the island into a ‘porcupine.’

WSJ OPINION By Robert C. O’Brien and Alexander B. Gray/

The fall of Afghanistan and the chaotic American withdrawal have been a propaganda windfall for autocrats across the world. Nowhere has the perception of American weakness been more trumpeted than in China, where state media outlets run predictions of American decline and warn U.S. allies and partners that they, too, will be abandoned. The Chinese Communist Party mouthpiece, Global Times, called Afghanistan an “omen” for Taiwan’s fate.

While images from Kabul have damaged U.S. global standing in the short term, Washington can still ensure that its interests are protected over the long term. China’s desire for a coerced unification with Taiwan is no secret. Beijing has increased military, economic and political pressure on Taipei over the past year and shows no sign of easing up. Post-Afghanistan, deterring China from a catastrophic invasion of Taiwan must be the Biden administration’s principal national security objective.

Washington and Taipei can take immediate steps to deter Chinese President Xi Jinping from invading the island democracy. A Taiwan that is what retired Admiral James Stavridis has labeled a “porcupine” would require China to mount a difficult amphibious landing and sustain a prolonged counterinsurgency—both of which could produce significant casualties for China.

First, the U.S. and its European allies should provide Taipei with significant quantities of the Naval Strike Missile, an anti-ship weapon set to deploy on U.S. Navy littoral combat ships. These missiles can launch from sea or land and have a range of about 100 nautical miles. A substantial number of them would seriously threaten any Chinese amphibious force. Packaged with the fast and mobile Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, these missiles could move quickly across the island both before and after landfall to harass the first wave and interrupt reinforcements.

Second, Taiwan should acquire Quickstrike air-dropped sea mines or other advanced sea mine technology from the U.S. The understanding that Taipei is capable, with U.S. assistance, of creating a denied-access zone in the Taiwan Strait would hamstring any Chinese amphibious force, especially one relying heavily on converted ferries and commercial ships. The mass mining of the Strait would undermine global trade by closing the waterway for a long time. But it’s important that Taiwan is able to preserve its freedom.

A third priority should be delivering shoulder-fired Stinger missiles to strategic locations, such as Taiwan’s more than 2,000 police stations. China has dramatically expanded its helicopter fleet in recent years. China might use airborne operations to strike key military and civilian targets ahead of an amphibious invasion. Taiwanese Stingers would blunt Beijing’s helicopter fleet advantage and complicate air operations in the island’s inland territory.

Finally, Taiwan must improve its trained military reserve. Taipei should encourage the formation of shooting clubs, similar to those popular in Central and Eastern Europe. While Taiwanese political culture has an ambivalent relationship with gun ownership, an organized, trained and equipped civilian corps willing to take up arms in the event of Chinese aggression is essential to the island’s defense. A well-armed civilian population could turn any invasion of Taiwan into a lengthy and costly affair.

Such a circumstance would, in turn, create serious domestic political repercussions for President Xi and the Chinese Communist Party, particularly as Chinese casualties mounted. China’s international standing would plummet if it conducted counter insurgency operations against the people of Taiwan in urban centers and rural villages. Beijing would quickly forfeit any pretense of being a “responsible stakeholder” by attempting to pacify democratic Taiwan in a prolonged and bloody guerrilla struggle.

Washington and Taipei have a relatively brief interval to change Beijing’s calculus. As the narrative of American decline becomes increasingly popular and politically expedient, it becomes more likely that China could use force to change the status quo in Taiwan. There is bipartisan support in Congress for strengthening Taiwan’s defenses. Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen has recently shown real openness to creative thinking on the subject, whether acquiring advanced unmanned aerial vehicles or investing in Abrams Main Battle Tanks.

By acting swiftly, the U.S. and Taiwan can dissuade Mr. Xi from making what could be the most disastrous geopolitical calculation since 1939.

Mr. O’Brien served as national security adviser and Mr. Gray as chief of staff of the White House National Security Council from 2019 to 2021
Abrignac Offline
#72 Posted:
Joined: 02-24-2012
Posts: 15,985
France depends on us more than we depend on them. Let them eat cake. I for one think it’s a beneficial partnership with Australia. We have more to gain by expanding our presence there than appeasing the French.
rfenst Offline
#73 Posted:
Joined: 06-23-2007
Posts: 35,007
Abrignac wrote:
France depends on us more than we depend on them. Let them eat cake. I for one think it’s a beneficial partnership with Australia. We have more to gain by expanding our presence there than appeasing the French.

And the Australians are getting nuclear instead of diesel. That will keep China "on its toes."
BuckyB93 Offline
#74 Posted:
Joined: 07-16-2004
Posts: 10,976
Speaking of nuclear, that's one thing that I think France has got right. 70% or more of their electricity is generated via nuclear plants. I believe it's something that the US should start greasing the skids for and start adopting as part of their "green" policy.

I get it... Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Foo-ku-$hima (did this word pass the censors? Gotta get creative like Dic Van Diyke) are examples of what can go wrong, but I think it's worth revisiting here in the US.
rfenst Offline
#75 Posted:
Joined: 06-23-2007
Posts: 35,007
BuckyB93 wrote:
Speaking of nuclear, that's one thing that I think France has got right. 70% or more of their electricity is generated via nuclear plants. I believe it's something that the US should start greasing the skids for and start adopting as part of their "green" policy.

I get it... Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Foo-ku-$hima (did this word pass the censors? Gotta get creative like Dic Van Diyke) are examples of what can go wrong, but I think it's worth revisiting here in the US.

I agree.
bgz Offline
#76 Posted:
Joined: 07-29-2014
Posts: 10,988
Ya... more nukes!

At least they seem to be getting more agressive with fusion. Saw someone made a big azz magnet.
HockeyDad Offline
#77 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 41,618
BuckyB93 wrote:
Speaking of nuclear, that's one thing that I think France has got right. 70% or more of their electricity is generated via nuclear plants. I believe it's something that the US should start greasing the skids for and start adopting as part of their "green" policy.

I get it... Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Foo-ku-$hima (did this word pass the censors? Gotta get creative like Dic Van Diyke) are examples of what can go wrong, but I think it's worth revisiting here in the US.



Good luck building a nuke! You shall have solar panels and shut up and like it.
HockeyDad Offline
#78 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 41,618
rfenst wrote:
And the Australians are getting nuclear instead of diesel. That will keep China "on its toes."


China has already been on their toes. Australia getting a new submarine operational 10 years from won’t change that.

The Chinese re-conquest of Taiwan is on everyone’s minds after the US failure and collapse in Afghanistan. That should be completed well before Australia has sub #1.
BuckyB93 Offline
#79 Posted:
Joined: 07-16-2004
Posts: 10,976
You forgot about wind turbines.

Submarines with wind turbines... it would be super stealthy especially if we paint them to look like trees or sumpin'. Green energy baby!
CelticBomber Offline
#80 Posted:
Joined: 05-03-2012
Posts: 6,412
BuckyB93 wrote:
You forgot about wind turbines.

Submarines with wind turbines... it would be super stealthy especially if we paint them to look like trees or sumpin'. Green energy baby!



Funny thing is diesel/electric subs are more stealthy. We leased Sweden's newest diesel sub and their crew for two years to use them as opposition during war games. In two years we never managed to detect them. They routinely sailed into and right back out of our carrier groups. They even managed to sink the USS Ronald Reagan with multiple torpedo launches during one exercise and got away clean. But, their down sides are pretty bad if you want to sail around the world through the deep water. Only the U.S. has the logistics capabilities to move troops, ships, weapons etc. etc. anywhere in the world. It's what makes us the sole remaining Super Power.


Up super early and bored.
Users browsing this topic
Guest
2 Pages<12