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Electric vehicles - what does the future hold?
HockeyDad Offline
#101 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
frankj1 wrote:
I remember my parents leaving empty milk bottles in the box on the stoop for the milkman (ours was a man) to take at the next delivery, but no money lost nor earned.

Don't remember brown bags going anywhere other than in my recycling bin.

but, at least around here, beer bottles and cans, soda bottles and cans, etc. etc. had deposits charged to make people feel like they were throwing away money when they littered...idiots used to throw bottles and cans out of the car windows.
Somehow, turning that disrespectful act into throwing away money worked.
At least in MA...much less road side trash.

I think the redeemable money deposits above and recycling glass/plastics/newsprint/cans etc are mutually exclusive acts of recycling.


Google CA Redemption

The state has hundreds of millions of dollars in unredeemed money because all the redemptions sites closed down. We charged the 10 cents but you could not get it back. It was just a tax.
HockeyDad Offline
#102 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
8trackdisco wrote:
Snoopy's brother Spike was from Needles. Then again, in California, there are Needles everywhere.


I’ll be honest. I never saw a needle on the streets in San Francisco. I’ll also be honest and say that I operated like a Democrat and NEVER went in the areas where you would see needles everywhere. Human feces….yeah, saw that.
HockeyDad Offline
#103 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
frankj1 wrote:
in another thread I mentioned how it's time for certain industries to put the touch on government to reimagine recycling...I used different words, but you get the point. (I don't want HD to yell at me again).


I’ve got an eye on you. Do you smell what Le HockeyDad is cooking.
BuckyB93 Offline
#104 Posted:
Joined: 07-16-2004
Posts: 12,819
Do we need to pull your finger to smell what Hockey Dad is cooking?
DrMaddVibe Offline
#105 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 52,896
HockeyDad wrote:
I’ve got an eye on you. Do you smell what Le HockeyDad is cooking.



Chili?
HockeyDad Offline
#106 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
BuckyB93 wrote:
Do we need to pull your finger to smell what Hockey Dad is cooking?


You might smell what I cooked yesterday.
8trackdisco Offline
#107 Posted:
Joined: 11-06-2004
Posts: 57,594
Sunoverbeach wrote:
I lost faith in recycling. I'm not opposed to the idea, but around here it's a hoax. A guy in waste management said they used to separate items, but it was determined to be too costly, so it all gets dumped now. They still have the different colored bins, but only for the optics.


Same thing here.
DrMaddVibe Offline
#108 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 52,896
8trackdisco wrote:
Same thing here.


The proof in that pudding is when they instituted that they not only charged you for the bins, but wanted you to separate and clean the material you were going to recycle...without any tax cut or rebate on waste management service. That's when I knew it was a scam and refused to do it at home.
DrMaddVibe Offline
#109 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 52,896
Uh-oh...


Japan Weighs Raising Taxes On EVs With "Higher Output Motors"



Just days ago, we reported that the UK was looking to raise more tax revenue from electric vehicles, shattering the years-long assumption that if you contributed to "helping the environment" by buying an EV, you'd be entitled to subsidies and tax credits.

Now, Japan appears to be following suit.

The country's internal affairs ministry is reportedly weighing whether or not to raise taxes on electric vehicles in order to make up for a shortfall in income from taxes on traditional gas powered cars, Bloomberg reported Thursday morning.

Currently, electric vehicle owners pay a flat fee of 25,000 yen per year to local governments, but the ministry is interested in potentially altering this framework for vehicles that have "higher output motors", the report says.

The ministry will reportedly ask the ruling coalition to "consider the change" for inclusion in the 2023 tax code, Bloomberg reports. Even then, the change could take several years to come into effect.

Recall, we wrote back on November 5 that UK chancellor Jeremy Hunt is expected to put an electric vehicle excise tax in place by 2025-2026.

This month's Autumn Statement will include the measures, according to FT, who said people familiar with the road tax is part of a larger plan to address a fall in motoring tax revenues caused by the shift to EVs, which leave out fuel-related taxes.

Fuel duty raises about £35bn, but the Treasury has warned that a growing number of EVs on the road could cause this number to plunge by £2.1bn by 2026-27. Ergo, a new excise duty on EVs could take place by 2025-2026.

More than 1 million EVs on the roads of the UK could wind up being affected. As is the case globally, sales of EVs continue to accelerate, with about 15% of new vehicles sold so far this year moving away from traditional ICE power.

How soon before the U.S. follows suit?

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/japan-weighs-raising-taxes-evs-higher-output-motors


So again, why the push to rid yourself of a gas powered engine? Face it. Governments really are working on a One World government system.

https://sdgs.un.org/2030agenda

They want you to own nothing and be happy.

https://resilientcitiesnetwork.org/

They're not operating in the shadows. It's all there for anyone to see and hear. Even the latest G20 and COP27 meetings, read the meeting notes on that!
Brewha Offline
#110 Posted:
Joined: 01-25-2010
Posts: 11,050
I never trusted the Japanese after they invaded Poland.
frankj1 Offline
#111 Posted:
Joined: 02-08-2007
Posts: 42,718
HockeyDad wrote:
Google CA Redemption

The state has hundreds of millions of dollars in unredeemed money because all the redemptions sites closed down. We charged the 10 cents but you could not get it back. It was just a tax.

we've had a few redemption sites close too, but the retailers have to take back the bottles and cans that are sold with deposits
HockeyDad Offline
#112 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
frankj1 wrote:
we've had a few redemption sites close too, but the retailers have to take back the bottles and cans that are sold with deposits


Retailers have to in California also but none do and there is no enforcement. I just tossed all my in the recycle bin and then Waste Management got the money so it really was just a tax.
ZRX1200 Offline
#113 Posted:
Joined: 07-08-2007
Posts: 57,997
https://youtu.be/x-6kHjF1U1E
Sunoverbeach Offline
#114 Posted:
Joined: 08-11-2017
Posts: 13,221
Boom! Found one

Bone stock Mustang driven by a 14yr old girl wipes the floor with a Tesla Plaid

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PD0KjfXTC4

*a tiny portion of the above statement may not be completely accurate*
Abrignac Offline
#115 Posted:
Joined: 02-24-2012
Posts: 16,291
Brewha wrote:
I never trusted the Japanese after they invaded Poland.


Or the Germans after they bombed Pearl Harbor.
DrMaddVibe Offline
#116 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 52,896
https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/electric-hummer-could-cost-much-100-charge-youtube-review-shows

There goes that 20 cents to the dollar claim.
Brewha Offline
#117 Posted:
Joined: 01-25-2010
Posts: 11,050
DrMaddVibe wrote:
https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/electric-hummer-could-cost-much-100-charge-youtube-review-shows

There goes that 20 cents to the dollar claim.

My car:
350 miles with a 82 kWh battery filled at 14 cents per kWh.
So that’s like $11.50 to fill the tank.
At 20 cents on the dollar to gas, $58 dollars to fill the tank.

What does it cost to fill your truck?
DrMaddVibe Offline
#118 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 52,896
75 bucks yesterday.
BuckyB93 Offline
#119 Posted:
Joined: 07-16-2004
Posts: 12,819
Charging my e-bike battery (36V/10.4Ah battery) with the current rate of about 22 cents/kWh (average here in MA at last I checked). Comes about to about 8 cents to fully charge it.

I've had it for about a year and have put on about 800 miles on it. The disk break pads need to be replaced at about 250 miles (I live in a town that is rather hilly). Pads cost about $5/set. Need to put a new rear tire as the tread it getting pretty low since it's mostly used on the road but has mtn bike tires.

So annual maintenance comes in to about $70/yr on the bike. About $40 tune up once a year at the bike shop (they grease the bearings, change the brake and shifting cables, and all that routine stuff), $20 for some new tires, new brake pads. Only popped a tire once as it picked up a nail somewhere along the way.

I've noticed that cold weather has decreased it's range. I would only charge it maybe once or twice a week in the summer, now have to do it every couple of days. Not a big deal but, as no surprise, batteries need more frequent charges in cold weather.

One thing to consider if going with EV vehicles is the environment where it will be used. In TX, CA, AZ, FL, etc. where it's rather warm year round is different than than in the higher latitudes. The range between charges will drop as the outside temp drops. Also need to factor in the terrain. The range of the vehicle will drop if you live in a hilly areas or in the mountains. Most of the range quoted on all vehicles are best case situations - flat land, ideal temps and environmental conditions,dry load/curb weight.
Brewha Offline
#120 Posted:
Joined: 01-25-2010
Posts: 11,050
BuckyB93 wrote:
Charging my e-bike battery (36V/10.4Ah battery) with the current rate of about 22 cents/kWh (average here in MA at last I checked). Comes about to about 8 cents to fully charge it.

I've had it for about a year and have put on about 800 miles on it. The disk break pads need to be replaced at about 250 miles (I live in a town that is rather hilly). Pads cost about $5/set. Need to put a new rear tire as the tread it getting pretty low since it's mostly used on the road but has mtn bike tires.

So annual maintenance comes in to about $70/yr on the bike. About $40 tune up once a year at the bike shop (they grease the bearings, change the brake and shifting cables, and all that routine stuff), $20 for some new tires, new brake pads. Only popped a tire once as it picked up a nail somewhere along the way.

I've noticed that cold weather has decreased it's range. I would only charge it maybe once or twice a week in the summer, now have to do it every couple of days. Not a big deal but, as no surprise, batteries need more frequent charges in cold weather.

One thing to consider if going with EV vehicles is the environment where it will be used. In TX, CA, AZ, FL, etc. where it's rather warm year round is different than than in the higher latitudes. The range between charges will drop as the outside temp drops. Also need to factor in the terrain. The range of the vehicle will drop if you live in a hilly areas or in the mountains. Most of the range quoted on all vehicles are best case situations - flat land, ideal temps and environmental conditions,dry load/curb weight.

You are spot on correct Mr. B.

More is that here in Texas, hot weather (100+ degrees) also decreases range cause the AC is blowing full gain. In fact the live range projections the car gives as you drive was revised this year to more accurately reflect range based on air temperature, elevation changes on your route, etc.

Another real world fact is that if you don’t have LFP batteries (some teslas do, some don't. Mine don’t) recommend that you only charge to 90% and don’t go below 5% unless you know you need it for a long trip. This is to minimize battery degradation (read range loss).

So with an EPA rating of 358 miles on a charge (me) you should think of it as 300 normally and more like 250 in the dead of winter. No an issue for me - could be for some.

Interestingly, the regenerative breaks put a good deal of power back in the car. I have seen my battery actually go up 1% on a long winding decline. The car almost never uses the brake pads. Oddly, Tesla specifies that if you live in wet salty areas, that the brake calipers be lubricated every 2 years - as they really don’t get used.
Brewha Offline
#121 Posted:
Joined: 01-25-2010
Posts: 11,050
DrMaddVibe wrote:
75 bucks yesterday.

My guess is that a Ford Lighting would be like $19 for a fill up at home.
Truck are not as efficient as sedans.
Brewha Offline
#122 Posted:
Joined: 01-25-2010
Posts: 11,050
As to the future, most manufacturers are looking at moving to LFP batteries over NMC. Particularly where the added weight isn’t not a concern, like power walls, delivery trucks and non performance cars.

This could be the “million mile battery” as LFPs have a very long service life.

And LFP’s (Lithium Iron Phosphate) address the legitimate concern of mining and using Cobalt. Like NMC’s (Nickel Magnesium Cobalt) batteries do.
BuckyB93 Offline
#123 Posted:
Joined: 07-16-2004
Posts: 12,819
I'm not against EV vehicles, I'm against the mandate for them when we don't have a clear path for a solution.

This is what I see for the EV dream and the green movement. Admittedly, I'm an outsider on the technology development for batteries (the heart and soul for most green energy solutions) but we don't have the ability to completely transform into the dream that we are being fed. It's a nice dream but physics and chemistry kind of get in the way of the dream.

It reminds me of working with some areas of superconductors in one life and some areas of military armor in another life . Company established goals that were not based on reality. We'd do weekly tech updates on the various R&D projects that we were working on. When I worked at theses places we had the luxury of a lot of money to spend (internal R&D money, SBIR's, collaborations with other companies and national labs). I've worked of the smartest people I've ever had the pleasure to work with. We would try to, cautiously, explain that the laws of physics and chemistry didn't add up to what they wanted. You can throw as much money as you want but it cannot change physics. Management didn't what to hear it. I remember being in a big meeting with big wigs giving a presentation of results, what we were going to do going forward, and a planned development schedule. The CEO had a temper tantrum because he didn't like to hear reality (laws of physics won't allow for what you signed us up for).

As I see it, here's the plan that the powers that be have for us: mandate the elimination of burning fossil fuels. Mandate the construction of solar farms and wind turbines (not a reliable source of energy). Mandate we all must go electric (even though that is next to impossible)... Then a miracle happens and we all rejoice

It's a project plan destined to fail
BuckyB93 Offline
#124 Posted:
Joined: 07-16-2004
Posts: 12,819
I'm not anti "green" energy (although the green energy term is a misnomer).

When we bought my son his first car this past Sept I narrowed it down to 2 in the price range for a first teen car: A full ICE Ford Fusion or a hybrid Ford Fusion. I was partial to the hybrid but it was twice the price. Considering that he's a teen he will likely get into an accident within a year or two (statistics say that teens are highest risk drivers and a liability for insurance purposes) we went with the cheaper ICE over the hybrid which has similar crash and reliability ratings. If he gets a couple years out of it without a crash, I'll take it as a win. Then he can hand it down to my daughter when she gets her license.

If I was buying it for myself and looking for a used commuter car I would have gone with the hybrid.
DrMaddVibe Offline
#125 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 52,896
Brewha wrote:
My guess is that a Ford Lighting would be like $19 for a fill up at home.
Truck are not as efficient as sedans.


Lol...those trucks are going for over 100k...IF you can even get one...and they're light duty.
ZRX1200 Offline
#126 Posted:
Joined: 07-08-2007
Posts: 57,997
Priced for the people!

Obviously the economy of scale works and the planet has been saved!

Unless you voted wrong.
MACS Offline
#127 Posted:
Joined: 02-26-2004
Posts: 76,478
I drove my truck across the country with no issues. I could drive almost 600 miles before I needed to stop for fuel (depending on gas station availability).

Went about 2400 miles. Didn't matter if it was hot, cold, hilly, flat or if I had my AC on full blast. Averaged almost 20 mpg with a V8 in a 5620 lb truck.

WINNING!!
tailgater Offline
#128 Posted:
Joined: 06-01-2000
Posts: 26,068
frankj1 wrote:
we've had a few redemption sites close too, but the retailers have to take back the bottles and cans that are sold with deposits


Giving back our nickels is their only redeeming quality.

tailgater Offline
#129 Posted:
Joined: 06-01-2000
Posts: 26,068
Brewha wrote:
As to the future, most manufacturers are looking at moving to LFP batteries over NMC. Particularly where the added weight isn’t not a concern, like power walls, delivery trucks and non performance cars.

This could be the “million mile battery” as LFPs have a very long service life.

And LFP’s (Lithium Iron Phosphate) address the legitimate concern of mining and using Cobalt. Like NMC’s (Nickel Magnesium Cobalt) batteries do.


You spelled "China" wrong.

DrMaddVibe Offline
#130 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 52,896

Truck Stops to Need Small-Town Levels of Energy to Charge EVs



A study conducted by utility company National Grid suggests that highway truck stops setting up for EVs in the next two decades could require the same amount of power as a small town might use.

Based on current traffic patterns, the study found, many highway charging sites (the equivalent to a highway gas station) will require 20 or more fast-chargers to meet EV demand.

The study focused on 71 highway sites in New York and Massachusetts with an eye toward finding solutions to "future proof" U.S. highways for the EV era.

There are a lot of hurdles to clear between where our infrastructure sits now and the seemingly inevitable future of widespread electric-vehicle use. A new study from utility company National Grid is showing just how tall some of those hurdles may be.

The study examined traffic patterns and projected charger use at 71 highway sites throughout New York and Massachusetts and considered relevant EV sales goals/mandates, based on a scenario in which all light-duty vehicles sold in the U.S. are electric by 2035 and all medium- and heavy-duty vehicles sold are EVs by 2045. Think of the highway sites as being equivalent to a highway truck stop or gas station. According to the study, in the next 10 years more than a quarter of the sites studied will require 20 or more fast-chargers, or the equivalent power of a sports stadium, to meet demand during peak hours.


As things stand now, fast-charging along American highways is still in the embryonic stage. To find 20 chargers in one spot, at least outside California and outside the Tesla Supercharger network, is nowhere near the norm. Sometimes, finding an open charger is only half the battle; finding a fast-charger in working order becomes even harder. Gas stations may be able to get by with only four or six pumps, but charging most EVs takes considerably longer than pumping a tank of gas, meaning there will be more time for potential overlap at the charger.

According to the findings, in 10 years more than a quarter of sites studied will require the same amount of power as an outdoor sports stadium to meet charging demand, with some requiring the same power as a small town within the next two decades. The study suggests plugging into the existing high-voltage electrical grid to "future-proof" high traffic areas on the highway. Conveniently, the study notes, these transmission lines already tend to mirror highway routes.

Equivalent to a Small Town

Sites acting as electrified truck stops could require the same amount of energy needed to power a small town. Size and weight are especially important for electric vehicles. Take the nearly 10,000-pound GMC Hummer EV, with its 2923-pound battery, which took an hour and 49 minutes to get from 10 to 90 percent state of charge. On the other hand, the 4800-pound Taycan, which accepts a lower peak power input than the Hummer, is able to charge from 5 to 80 percent state of charge in a claimed 23 minutes. It's not hard to think about how a parking lot full of electric semi-trucks, all towing roughly 40 tons, would require a huge power output.

"No Regrets"

Transitioning our highway infrastructure will not, and can not effectively switch overnight. Of the $5 billion the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law from last year promised, the first $900 million or so has been approved for EV chargers to cover 53,000 miles of highway throughout the country.

In its summary of the study, National Grid says a goal is to figure out how to do "no regrets" upgrades at "no-regrets" sites—"so we can build grid infrastructure once, and build it right." In what seems like an understatement, the power company says upgrading and building high-voltage interconnections along highways "can take years," which is the points of its study urging the industry to plan ahead for it now. One thing is for certain: the highway landscape is going to look different—and much more electrified—10 and 20 years into the future.

https://www.autoweek.com/news/a42073541/truck-stops-energy-cost-electric-vehicles/



Um, yeah...I'm gonna need you to come in this weekend...yeah...and if that's okay with you I'm going to need you to build a lot more nuclear power plants...yeah...soooo, those ugly fans out there in the plains aren't going to affect the power needed...um, yeah. That means to little panels everyone is putting on their heads too...yeah.
HockeyDad Offline
#131 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
Sounds like more work for Le HockeyDad!
Gene363 Offline
#132 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
HockeyDad wrote:
Sounds like more work for Le HockeyDad!


Sounds like a new market for gas turbine peaking units.
Stogie1020 Offline
#133 Posted:
Joined: 12-19-2019
Posts: 3,713
Two things come to mind after reading that article (thanks for posting DMV).

1. The nature of the "refueling experience" is going to be a lot different in 20 years. Right now, the gas station is a very transitory place where we might spend a few minutes, reluctantly, mingling with the unwashed masses as we all anxiously wait for the tank to fill so we can get the hell out of there with our lives intact. Occasionally, we might be extra adventurous and actually go inside the store to relive ourselves or peruse the vast selection of preservative filled goodies or mystery meats glistening on stainless steel rollers.

With the extended times for EV charging, though, we will be a captive audience for at least 20-40 minutes. It's possible that the in-car entertainment system may be enough to keep us occupied at first, but I venture to guess that these charging stations are going to become very commercialized and also very "experience oriented." There may be fee-based short-duration entertainment, quality food offerings for an actual sit-down meal, coffee lounges with relaxing places to spend time, etc. Of course, eventually the heyday of the charging "oasis" will pass and we be back to standing near our car while the volts rush in and we clean the center console of old apple cores, dried booger tissues and some unrecognizable wrapper from food we don't recall eating.

2. If there is a tremendous uptick in the infrastructure of EV systems along major travel routes, requiring the use of land for transmission lines, etc., is this the time to really start thinking about fast electric powered inter-city trains? If there were ample, daily-use EV vehicles at each end for kiosk-style renting (like the rental bikes in many cities), I think this would be a much more viable option. Since we are already apparently going to run or enhance high powered lines along major travel routes, this seems like a no-brainer.
Gene363 Offline
#134 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
Stogie1020 wrote:
Two things come to mind after reading that article (thanks for posting DMV).

1. The nature of the "refueling experience" is going to be a lot different in 20 years. Right now, the gas station is a very transitory place where we might spend a few minutes, reluctantly, mingling with the unwashed masses as we all anxiously wait for the tank to fill so we can get the hell out of there with our lives intact. Occasionally, we might be extra adventurous and actually go inside the store to relive ourselves or peruse the vast selection of preservative filled goodies or mystery meats glistening on stainless steel rollers.

With the extended times for EV charging, though, we will be a captive audience for at least 20-40 minutes. It's possible that the in-car entertainment system may be enough to keep us occupied at first, but I venture to guess that these charging stations are going to become very commercialized and also very "experience oriented." There may be fee-based short-duration entertainment, quality food offerings for an actual sit-down meal, coffee lounges with relaxing places to spend time, etc. Of course, eventually the heyday of the charging "oasis" will pass and we be back to standing near our car while the volts rush in and we clean the center console of old apple cores, dried booger tissues and some unrecognizable wrapper from food we don't recall eating.

2. If there is a tremendous uptick in the infrastructure of EV systems along major travel routes, requiring the use of land for transmission lines, etc., is this the time to really start thinking about fast electric powered inter-city trains? If there were ample, daily-use EV vehicles at each end for kiosk-style renting (like the rental bikes in many cities), I think this would be a much more viable option. Since we are already apparently going to run or enhance high powered lines along major travel routes, this seems like a no-brainer.


Lot Lizards, "We can handle that."
BuckyB93 Offline
#135 Posted:
Joined: 07-16-2004
Posts: 12,819
Once we invent a Star Trek teleporter thingy and start mining dilithium all this discussion will become moot.
Stogie1020 Offline
#136 Posted:
Joined: 12-19-2019
Posts: 3,713
Gene363 wrote:
Lot Lizards, "We can handle that."


Haha, Gene! One of the things that popped into my mind was road-side gentlemen's clubs. 20 minutes = $$
BuckyB93 Offline
#137 Posted:
Joined: 07-16-2004
Posts: 12,819
I think we have a couple C-bid residents who we could appoint to coordinate the truck stop entertainment issues.
HockeyDad Offline
#138 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
Stogie1020 wrote:


is this the time to really start thinking about fast electric powered inter-city trains?


They are building one in California between LA and San Francisco right now.
DrafterX Offline
#139 Posted:
Joined: 10-18-2005
Posts: 96,594
But what about da spotted owls and chit..?? Mellow
Gene363 Offline
#140 Posted:
Joined: 01-24-2003
Posts: 28,772
HockeyDad wrote:
They are building one in California between LA and San Francisco right now.


Actual construction or just spending?
Stogie1020 Offline
#141 Posted:
Joined: 12-19-2019
Posts: 3,713
HockeyDad wrote:
They are building one in California between LA and San Francisco right now.

No they aren't... I mean, let's be real. No they aren't.
HockeyDad Offline
#142 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
Stogie1020 wrote:
No they aren't... I mean, let's be real. No they aren't.


Are so! It’s gonna open its first segment in 2029.
HockeyDad Offline
#143 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
Gene363 wrote:
Actual construction or just spending?


Both!

It’s gonna be awesome and solve the housing crisis. Poor and middle class can live in the Central Valley and take the high speed rail to the Bay Area to provide goods and services to the wealthy!
HockeyDad Offline
#144 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
DrafterX wrote:
But what about da spotted owls and chit..?? Mellow


They can ride for half fare.
HockeyDad Offline
#145 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
In 2035 the place to be is living in Fresno with an electric car. Let the gentrification begin!
ZRX1200 Offline
#146 Posted:
Joined: 07-08-2007
Posts: 57,997
https://youtu.be/eosf7CeSGyA

Rich does good funny videos this is no exception.
DrMaddVibe Offline
#147 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 52,896
Wait...what????


Switzerland Considers Electric Vehicle Ban To Avoid Blackouts



Switzerland could limit the use of electric vehicles (EVs) in cases of electricity supply shortages this winter under a new four-step plan to prevent power cuts and blackouts.

To ensure energy security this winter, Switzerland could become the first country to limit the driving and use of EVs, German daily Der Spiegel reports, citing multiple media reports on the Swiss four-stage action plan to avoid blackouts.

Driving EVs could be banned in Switzerland unless in cases of “absolutely necessary journeys” in stage three of the power conservation plans. The country also plans a stricter speed limit on highways in the recently proposed action plan, which has yet to be adopted.

Switzerland typically imports electricity from France and Germany to meet all its power demand, but this year supply from its neighbors is constrained.

In France, the nuclear fleet availability is much lower than usual, which has led to the country becoming a net importer of electricity after decades of being a net exporter. The French electricity grid is at higher risk of strained power supplies in January 2023 than previously estimated due to lower nuclear power generation. The country could face the risk of power cuts this winter when electricity supply may not be enough to meet demand, Xavier Piechaczyk, the head of grid operator RTE, said earlier this week.

In Germany, the situation is similar, as utilities are having to make do with no Russian pipeline gas supply. 

Switzerland’s power supply remains uncertain for the winter and troubles with enough electricity capacity cannot be ruled out, the Swiss Federal Electricity Commission, Elcom, said as early as in June. Due to the expected lower availability of French nuclear power generation and of France’s power exports to Switzerland, the Swiss imports of power generated in France is likely to be much lower this winter compared to previous winter seasons, Elcom said.

Therefore, Switzerland may need to cover its electricity import needs of around 4 gigawatt hours (GWh) from imports from its other neighbors Germany, Austria, and Italy. However, the power export availability of those countries would heavily depend on the available fossil fuels, mostly natural gas, according to Elcom.

https://www.zerohedge.com/energy/switzerland-considers-electric-vehicle-ban-avoid-blackouts



Looks like common sense is starting to kick in.
DrMaddVibe Offline
#148 Posted:
Joined: 10-21-2000
Posts: 52,896
ZRX1200 wrote:
https://youtu.be/eosf7CeSGyA

Rich does good funny videos this is no exception.



He does a great job exposing the untold truths of EV's and their charging stations.

I also laughed at this one too...

https://twitchy.com/samj-3930/2022/12/02/john-haywards-thread-exposes-the-elites-endgame-with-evs-and-its-not-about-saving-the-planet/
HockeyDad Offline
#149 Posted:
Joined: 09-20-2000
Posts: 44,242
Outrage. Don’t be cutting into Le HockeyDad’s revenue stream.
ZRX1200 Offline
#150 Posted:
Joined: 07-08-2007
Posts: 57,997
Brewha has your back, just keep the Dave’s Killer bread away.
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