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Mary, Mary, quite contrary, How does your garden grow?
201. Author: Jakethesnake86Date: Thu, 5/23/2024, 7:57PM EST
@macs sounds like they’re lacking fertilizer. If they’re draining well and the pot is large enough.

I’d try some miracle gro. Just to see if it responds. I recommend miracle gro cause the plant can absorb it through the leaves as well as the soil. See if they respond to that

It could also be too much water but if those pots are draining that shouldn’t be the case. But too much water will most certainly cause yellowing
202. Author: Jakethesnake86Date: Thu, 5/23/2024, 7:58PM EST
@robert that corn should turn super dark green by next week. Sounds like you’ve got them off to a great start
203. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Thu, 5/23/2024, 8:31PM EST
^

Here's a pic for you, Jake. https://imgur.com/a/0WiQGjW

Close to the 3 week mark.
204. Author: RayRDate: Fri, 5/24/2024, 9:34AM EST
^ Looking good Robert.
205. Author: Jakethesnake86Date: Fri, 5/24/2024, 5:27PM EST
Robert that looks nice
206. Author: AbrignacDate: Fri, 5/24/2024, 10:25PM EST
RobertHively wrote:
^

Here's a pic for you, Jake. https://imgur.com/a/0WiQGjW

Close to the 3 week mark.


Looks nice.
207. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Sat, 5/25/2024, 8:01AM EST

Thanks guys. I'll try to post an update in a month or so.
208. Author: rfenstDate: Sat, 5/25/2024, 9:57AM EST
RobertHively wrote:
She might be watering them too much. If it doesn't rain we might water our garden once every 2 or 3 days.

Also, make sure the water is draining out of the holes in the bottom of the pot, they could be clogged up.
....

My first thought too. May have also led to some root rot or root girdling.
209. Author: RayRDate: Sun, 5/26/2024, 12:20AM EST
rfenst wrote:
My first thought too. May have also led to some root rot or root girdling.


I don't know, he did say the drainage in the container was good. If the pot is too small for the type of plant, then it might be root bound and stressed. Could be other things too.
But ya, roots sitting in stagnant water (anaerobic conditions) isn't good. It promotes anaerobic bacteria that make compounds toxic to plants.
Foilage needs CO2, and roots need oxygen.

210. Author: Jakethesnake86Date: Tue, 5/28/2024, 12:39AM EST
Just curious what kind of sweet corn did you go with Robert? I plant a couple different kinds always liked ambrosia and bodacious pretty well. There’s so many different varieties I don’t know much about them as I only grow enough to eat
211. Author: 8trackdiscoDate: Sun, 6/2/2024, 3:29PM EST
Is there a best or forbidden time of year to aerate a lawn?

What do you do after?
212. Author: MACSDate: Sun, 6/2/2024, 3:51PM EST
I did mine in the spring. All you are doing is decompacting the soil and allowing oxygen to penetrate to the roots of your grass.
213. Author: BuckyB93Date: Sun, 6/2/2024, 7:59PM EST
8trackdisco wrote:
Is there a best or forbidden time of year to air-ate a lawn?

What do you do after?


I wouldn't do it. Just let Jimmy Hoffa rest in pieces.
214. Author: 8trackdiscoDate: Sun, 6/2/2024, 8:26PM EST
MACS wrote:
I did mine in the spring. All you are doing is decompacting the soil and allowing oxygen to penetrate to the roots of your grass.


Why would you put all of those holes in a plastic lawn?
215. Author: BuckyB93Date: Sun, 6/2/2024, 8:30PM EST
Astroturf has to breathe too.
216. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Mon, 6/3/2024, 8:01PM EST
Jakethesnake86 wrote:
Just curious what kind of sweet corn did you go with Robert? I plant a couple different kinds always liked ambrosia and bodacious pretty well. There’s so many different varieties I don’t know much about them as I only grow enough to eat



We planted 29 rows of Peaches & Cream and 6 rows of Golden Bantam that we had from a previous season.

I'll check out the two you mentioned. We like trying new varieties.

Sorry it took so long to get back to you. Storm knocked the internet out for a week.
217. Author: BuckyB93Date: Mon, 6/3/2024, 8:55PM EST
All my plants are in the soil container garden on the deck at the new apt so starting from scratch. Veggies and flowers. Pole beans, peas, hot and sweet peppers, cherry toms and regular tomatoes cucumbers for veggies. For herbs they would include chives, basil, oregano, rosemary, parsley, lavender, tyme, sage, and probably a couple others that don't come to mind.

Flowers are Sunflowers, marigolds of a couple different colors, petunias, and prolly a couple others that don't come to mind. Local garden nursery had a sale on stuff so I dropped like $50 buying stuff. Prolly not get a return on the investment veggie wise but many hobbies have a negative return on investment money wise. Sending time on many hobbies and the mental payback has no dollar value (gardening, smoking cigars, playing music, hiking, biking, working on a car, screwing around with computers etc..).

I'd like to attract bees to pollinate plants and get some humming birds buzzing around. Hopefully the flowers I chose will keep them coming back for more. The peppers have already started making flowers and some have already been pollinate. Flowers have closed down and are in the process process of making fruit. It seems a bit early but who am I to say?

The flowers are annuals, I'd rather have perennials and bulb stuff but they wouldn't work well in deck grow containers. Neighbor across the street has probably10 well established raised beds and some of their perinatals are off and running, Kinda jealous. Maybe I should go introduce myself and ask it they want to share some cuttings for my little container garden.
218. Author: BuckyB93Date: Mon, 6/3/2024, 9:05PM EST
Two eight NINE!
219. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Wed, 6/12/2024, 3:45PM EST
Jakethesnake86 wrote:
Red armor is very very good air cooled 2 stroke oil. I run it myself. I’ve taken a few 2 stroke chainsaws apart. I’ve got 10 or so top notch husqvarna saws. It’s another weird hobby of mine. Do not recommend lucas 2 stroke at all or stihl silver. Use anything but those



I'm down to less than two quarts of the Red Armor, so I'll probably buy another gallon this winter.

It's 77 dollars a gallon on Amazon. Up 5 bucks from 1 1/2 ago.

Searched around a little and found some Husqvarna XP+ 2 cycle for 44 dollars a gallon--almost half the price of Red Armor.

What's your opinion on the XP? Do you think Red Armor is worth almost twice the price?



The garden & the corn plot are looking really good thus far.

Temps been really cool and dry lately--few nights in upper 40's to low 50's. Plenty of sunshine in the day though.

Been watering every 2 or 3 days. We been using the water pump and water from the creek.
220. Author: MACSDate: Wed, 6/12/2024, 4:04PM EST
8trackdisco wrote:
Why would you put all of those holes in a plastic lawn?


The front yard, ya jackwagon!

Wife has taken to watering the plants morning and evening and keeping them a little more shaded. Seems to be working. She harvested a handful of tomatoes already and the plant already has more of them. She's got some pretty good sized eggplants too.

Not a euphemism... actual eggplants.
221. Author: Jakethesnake86Date: Wed, 6/12/2024, 9:49PM EST
Robert the husky oil is good. My personal opinion is the red armor is better. I’ve taken some stuff completely apart ram on various oils. Red armor leaves the most oil behind (protection). You’ll be ok with either. I just like the residual oil.
222. Author: Jakethesnake86Date: Wed, 6/12/2024, 9:50PM EST
I run 32:1 in everything 2 stroke with the exception of using red armor. I’ll go the recommended 50:1 with it because it’s gonna protect you at that ratio
223. Author: Jakethesnake86Date: Wed, 6/12/2024, 9:58PM EST
So the bottle of red armor will make more gallons of mix fuel. For me
224. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Thu, 6/13/2024, 3:19PM EST
^

I'm going to make a new "Yard Machines" thread for this
225. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Thu, 6/13/2024, 3:27PM EST
A couple days ago I dug up NINE "Rose of Sharon" bushes/trees growing near the creek on the western end of the property. We distributed them throughout the yard.

Got a lot of poison Ivy on my arms for my effort. Mix that in with the biting insects and I'm itching. "Tecnu" brand scrub and spray are the only things I have found that really work. Using them a couple times daily.

Starter rope on my 2-stroke water pump broke yesterday evening. Buffalo Corp (China chit) is sending us a new starter assembly for free. Plus we went ahead and ordered another complete pump bc 2 is 1 and 1 is none. The only machine I don't have a backup for is the machine that broke...

I wish Stihl made a water pump with their "4 mix" engine... If these two 2 stroke pumps don't hold up then I'm going to drop the coin on a Honda WX-10 4 stroke water pump--commercial grade engine, over 500 bucks after tax. Next couple watering sessions we're back to the bucket brigade--takin water from our water catchment barrels.

Used "Sevin" insect spray on the corn plot. Took almost a gallon to cover the 35 rows. The Japanese beetles were either dying or flying. Got to buy more of that.

226. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Thu, 6/13/2024, 4:25PM EST

Corn Plot around 5 week mark: https://imgur.com/a/corn-plot-pic-2-8mW9yW5

Part of main garden near 4 week mark: https://imgur.com/a/part-of-big-garden-9gE8P6K

In the Main garden photo, the garden extends out to the left (out of picture) forming kind of an "L" shape. Over there we have potatoes, beans, peas, cucumbers etc.

227. Author: BuckyB93Date: Thu, 6/13/2024, 9:19PM EST
My small collection of container plants: Peas, beans, tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, herbs and flowers are going strong. Some peppers plants and and tom plants broke into flowers. Maybe a week or so they will start making fruit.
228. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Thu, 6/13/2024, 9:36PM EST

^

We got our first two squash and our first zucchini this evening. Going to be a lot more squash and zucchini to harvest in the next few days.

Got a few banana peppers about ready too, but other than that nothing else is close.

Here's a good one of the corn. My wife took it this evening: https://imgur.com/a/corn-plot-3iVjQ5B
229. Author: Jakethesnake86Date: Fri, 6/14/2024, 9:43PM EST
Corn looks nice and healthy. Should turn out well if weather continues to cooperate
230. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Mon, 6/17/2024, 7:18PM EST
^

I appreciate you taking the time to help me make my garden better
231. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Mon, 6/17/2024, 7:26PM EST

Squash & Zucchini haul this evening: https://imgur.com/a/X1poB5D


Got that new water pump delivered today. Upon first inspection, they forgot to attach the primer bulb line to the carb. Fixed it, but not a good sign. Garden watered, heavily.

New starter assembly for old pump should be here tomorrow.

Also, a wasp stung me near my left eye yesterday. Sting is in between my eyebrow and the start of my eye lid. The entire left side of my face is swollen. Could hardly open my left eye this morning.

The right side of my face looks fine, but the left side of my face looked like Mickey Rourke after all of his plastic surgery.

Was in the shower scrubbing the poison ivy that's all over my arms and legs, from last week, lookin' like a Mickey Rourke freak. I thought, one more injury and I'm going to have to go on the 15 day DL.

Then I thought about what my FOG neighbor said when I was 'bout to die planting all of that corn...

"This ain't no union job son" Lol! Indeed.


P.S. The swelling is going down in my face and the Ivy is almost dried up. I'll live.
232. Author: Jakethesnake86Date: Mon, 6/17/2024, 9:55PM EST
Any time I can help is awesome Robert.

If you’re sure you’ve been in poison ivy. Get to the shower and use dawn dish soap. It’s very good at getting the oil off. If you get the oil off in time you will not get the rash. Scrub yourself with a washcloth like you’re trying to sand a nice piece of furniture. It actually works. I used to do a lot of chainsawing and poison is pretty well the normal. If I got home relatively soon and used the dawn it nearly eliminated any rash. I get poison pretty bad so I am pretty damn good at IDing those suckers. Dawn is the best stuff I’ve found but you’ve gotta get the oil off as soon as possible
233. Author: jeeblingDate: Mon, 6/17/2024, 10:18PM EST
Robert, you sound like someone out of a movie lol. Best of luck getting through the rest of the season with no mishaps.
234. Author: RayRDate: Tue, 6/18/2024, 8:40AM EST
Most people avoid farming and gardening because it is fraught with dangers and mishaps.
235. Author: SunoverbeachDate: Tue, 6/18/2024, 8:55AM EST
Yep, almost lost a pinky finger last week due to imprudent pruning
236. Author: MACSDate: Tue, 6/18/2024, 9:32AM EST
Growing up in Rhode Island we kids were out in the woods all day. Trekking through either playing or looking for new fishing spots.

I've had poison Ivy, poison Oak, poison Sumac... and ALL of it sucks. But Jake's correct... get that oil off you ASAP and it'll go a lot better for you.
237. Author: frankj1Date: Tue, 6/18/2024, 10:47AM EST
I grew up across the street from woods, spent thousands of hours hiking around and stuff, many friend had poison ivy many times but I've never had it in my life...so far.
My property line today ends where Blue Hill Reservation begins, thousands of acres of woods and stuff. Still never had it.

Close friend was in charge of Buildings and Grounds at Boston College for a couple decades and he always said if at all possible, dunk yo azz in the ocean asap if you've been in contact with the stuff...I guess it helped that he spent much of his youth in seaside towns.
238. Author: MACSDate: Tue, 6/18/2024, 11:36AM EST
You lucky... 15% of people have no reaction to poison ivy. I ain't one of 'em. Mad
239. Author: RayRDate: Tue, 6/18/2024, 11:55AM EST
RobertHively wrote:
Squash & Zucchini haul this evening: https://imgur.com/a/X1poB5D


That is a nice haul. It's way too early up in these parts for Squash & Zucchini.
Lettuce is available in abundance now, I picked a mixed variety of lettuce, some baby Red Russian Kale, endive and Salad Burnet for a nice big salad for lunch today. We had a nice morning shower, lettuce is always best when picked after a rain.
240. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Tue, 6/18/2024, 5:03PM EST
^

Our lettuce isn't doing that great. What's come up is growing ok, but most of the seed we put down didn't even start to grow. IDK why...

We got plenty of squash and zucchini though. Picked more of it this evening. We've harvested 48 of them so far.

I had a trash bag 3/4 of the way filled up with em today. Had the bag slung over my back. Lol

We're eating a lot of it, freezing some, giving away some and wife found a cold canned pickled zucchini recipe. She cut the zucchini into spears...
241. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Tue, 6/18/2024, 5:10PM EST
I'm a pro at getting poison ivy and poison oak. I even managed to get it last February. There was a vine of it wrapped around a cherry tree I cut up into logs.

I knew I was going to get it, but worked anyway. Before I moved up here I'd get it from along the banks of a couple rivers I wade fished. I used to stream fish for smallmouth bass quite a bit...

I have been using "Tecnu" brand poison ivy scrub for years.

Here's what the bottle looks like: https://www.forestry-suppliers.com/p/25308/45701/tecnu-extreme-poison-ivy-scrub?V=8&msclkid=f5d74b616b19155746ed2d10c1034210

It does a great job at removing the oils and drying poison ivy out. Cortaid used to make a similar product but I think they discontinued it.

I have a lot of dried out poison ivy on my arms and legs right now. It looks bad, but I never itch if I use the scrub once or twice a day. I pack it on all of my camping trips just incase...

I also use the Tecnu spray.

I went down to an uncleared portion of my creek, wearing shorts and a sleeveless t-shirt, and dug up 9 shrubs/trees. So I kinda figured I'd get da ivy. I had planned to get them last winter but never got around to it.

I'll give dawn soap a try next time. I'm always open to new remedies, because I'm sure I'll get it again before the year is over.

Oh, and both sides of my face match up again. No more Mickey Rourke look. It was trendy, but didn't last.

242. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Tue, 6/18/2024, 5:12PM EST
jeebling wrote:
Robert, you sound like someone out of a movie lol. Best of luck getting through the rest of the season with no mishaps.


Well I've been called a character a time or two.

This place is out of a movie... Really nice land once we worked on it for a couple yrs.
243. Author: RayRDate: Tue, 6/18/2024, 6:26PM EST
RobertHively wrote:
^

Our lettuce isn't doing that great. What's come up is growing ok, but most of the seed we put down didn't even start to grow. IDK why...

We got plenty of squash and zucchini though. Picked more of it this evening. We've harvested 48 of them so far.

I had a trash bag 3/4 of the way filled up with em today. Had the bag slung over my back. Lol

We're eating a lot of it, freezing some, giving away some and wife found a cold canned pickled zucchini recipe. She cut the zucchini into spears...


Lettuce seed needs cool temps, exposure to light, and of course, moisture to germinate. I typically start lettuce indoors in my basement grow area as transplants in April here. Don't bury lettuce seeds in the soil, it's best to start germinating the seeds by laying them on top of moist soil where they will see the light. When the seed germinates, that initial little root radical will drill down into the soil an away it goes. I transplant most of the Looseleaf and Butterhead cut and come again varieties into containers and grow bags, even alongside tomato and pepper transplants at the edge of the containers. Lettuce has shallow roots, so they don't compete much with deep-rooting plants. I'll plant all the extra transplants into the regular garden too, especially later varieties like romaine, but the others grow faster in containers for me and you don't get as many pests and critters munching on the leaves.
Whatever I have growing now will keep us with a good supply of lettuce through early-mid July. With the heat of the summer, they will eventually want to bolt, flower, and go to seed. That's fine, I keep some going so I can collect seed for next year.
I'll start the process over again in early August for a fall crop.


244. Author: frankj1Date: Tue, 6/18/2024, 8:18PM EST
RobertHively wrote:
^

Our lettuce isn't doing that great. What's come up is growing ok, but most of the seed we put down didn't even start to grow. IDK why...

We got plenty of squash and zucchini though. Picked more of it this evening. We've harvested 48 of them so far.

I had a trash bag 3/4 of the way filled up with em today. Had the bag slung over my back. Lol

We're eating a lot of it, freezing some, giving away some and wife found a cold canned pickled zucchini recipe. She cut the zucchini into spears...

spiralize some zukes and use instead of pasta.
245. Author: Jakethesnake86Date: Tue, 6/18/2024, 9:18PM EST
Good info on the lettuce ray. I’ve never grown much but when I did I planted mine in the fall with broccoli and turnips. End of august early September. They can take a little frost I believe? I know the broccoli and cabbage /turnips can take several light frosts without any real damage. So yeah you might just be a little late for an early spring lettuce.

I’d try some more seeds end of august ish
246. Author: frankj1Date: Tue, 6/18/2024, 9:24PM EST
my garden: Where vegetables go to die.
247. Author: RayRDate: Wed, 6/19/2024, 9:14AM EST
Jakethesnake86 wrote:
Good info on the lettuce ray. I’ve never grown much but when I did I planted mine in the fall with broccoli and turnips. End of august early September. They can take a little frost I believe? I know the broccoli and cabbage /turnips can take several light frosts without any real damage. So yeah you might just be a little late for an early spring lettuce.

I’d try some more seeds end of august ish


Yes, lettuce can take a light frost.
Timing is the big thing with lettuce as with other veggies, as you know.
Lettuce doesn't have a lot of pest or disease pressures around here anyway. Slugs can be a problem on inground plants if you have a lot of those suckers around. Sluggo (iron phosphate) is the simple solution for that. I've done beer traps in the past too.

I'm in Zone 6 here in Western NY, so what I do is based on the climate here.
https://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/pages/map-downloads

Black Thumb Frankie, you are in Zone 6 too in Massachusetts.

248. Author: jeeblingDate: Wed, 6/19/2024, 9:46AM EST
I don’t have a garden this year due to medical aggravation. Last couple of years I sprinkled some seeds to see what would come up. The tender sprouts endured light frost no problem. The spinach and Romaine almost seemed to thrive on it. The summer sun wiped them out. I let them bolt and wither. The Romain now volunteers in Spring and Fall. Healthy, robust volunteers at that. I had hoped my pole beans and field peas would volunteer but they didn’t. Fresh tender Lima beans are the best! Yummo!
249. Author: RobertHivelyDate: Wed, 6/19/2024, 7:14PM EST

Garden watered. Squash/zucchini picked. Got 5 banana peppers today as well.

Creek is getting low--never seen it run dry though. Have a nice deep area around main garden, but it's a shoal near where the corn plot is located.

It's really low there, so I moved a damn boulder and created a small little space for the hose and filter to fit right in its footprint. Added a couple small rocks on the hose for stability and was good to go.

Ray, thanks for the info. I copied and pasted it to my email and will add to my notes later. Wife and I still need to learn when to plant different vegetables. We know a few things but have a lot to learn.

Frank, thanks for the suggestion. Hadn't thought about trying that. I added a cheapo "spiralizer" to my Amazon cart. If we like zucchini prepared that way I'll get a nicer one when that one breaks.

Over and out.
250. Author: BuckyB93Date: Wed, 6/19/2024, 7:54PM EST
My small deck garden is going good. Haven't really looked at it too much. Maybe once a week to make sure they still have water for the self watering thingy I put in. It's working like a charm. It wouldn't work for a real garden but for the deck garden it works well. Tomatoes are still popping flowers. I'm sure some that I saw last week have already pollinated and started to make fruit but didn't look at them too closely. Peppers still going strong and flowering. Noticed a baby sweet pepper about the size of a golf ball on one. Cukes, pole beans, and peas climbing up the lattice nicely.

Plenty of green growth. Looking forward to the flowers to start popping on the cukes, peas, and beans and the fruit to start growing.

Herbs are growing nicely too. Take a pinch here and there off of the plants when the recipe that I'm cooking calls for it. I might have to get an end table thingy when the season ends and bring them in to keep them going. I like cooking with fresh herbs when radially available.

Reading above, now I'm kicking myself for not growing some lettuce. I still have a couple unused grow bags and a couple bags of soil left. Maybe starting a container of a random variety of leaf lettuce might be on the to do list this weekend.
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